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Ellis Pugh and Jacob Croy Land in Philadelphia

Penn’s Landing

The Delaware River, large and imposing, looks much as it did over 200 years ago but the surroundings are far from the same. Wooden piers have been replaced by concrete and steel and passage to New Jersey is by bridge (the Ben Franklin) not boat. Ellis Pugh, my six times great grandfather, landed here with his family in 1687 with his family to settle in the Welch Tract promised to the Welch Quakers. More about that in a later post. I began this trip to Pennsylvania unsure of when (or if) Jacob Croy began his life in America here. Now it is clear. With the help of some friendly and expert help from the people at the History Society of Pennsylvania, I wound my way through microfilm to discover the exact day he floated up the Delaware and landed in Philadelphia, taking the oath required by all who entered the colony at that time. Until I receive permission from the Society, I can’t show the actual text but it says, “At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, October 12th 1741 Present George Thomas, Esq. Lieutenant Governor, Samuel Hasell & Abraham Taylor Esq. The Palatine’s whos Names are underwritten imported in the Ship Friendship Alex(ander) Thomson Master from Roterdam but last from Cowes did on this day take oaths to that Government” Below listed in halting writing were “Jacob Croy” and another Croy that at this time I think is “Simon Jacob Croy” but it is difficult to cypher. I will research this more later but for now it seems that Grace Croy Steck, who did her own research in the early 1930’s, was right. When he arrived, he could easily have walked down an alley like this one which still exists in Philadelphia.

Elfreth’s Alley, Philadelphia

 

About croywright

The author, a writer of history and historical fiction, always yearned to go back in time.

2 responses »

  1. Which Jacob Croy (I or II) arrived on the Delaware River in 1741? I know of one likely born around 1740 and then one, son of John Croy (c1760-1824) and Susannah Huston Croy named Jacob born c. 1790. I would be very interested in information distinguishing these three Jacobs.

    Reply
    • As I noted in a later post, Grace Croy Steck who did this research (that I tried to confirm in Philadelphia while I was there) may have made an error in reading the old writing of the time. I cannot confirm a Jacob Croy’s arrival in Pennsylvania. The first Jacob I can confirm (by age) is the one in Londonderry, certainly my 4X great grandfather. I think it likely that a Jacob Croy came before him and fathered (grand-fathered?) Jacob, Richard, Mathias, and perhaps John.My inference is based on naming patterns at the time in which male children, particularly Scot and German, were named for the Grandfather on each side.Confirmed Jacobs are: Jacob (married Catherine Beam)-first son of Mathias, Jacob (moved to Indiana married Sarah Stoner)-second son of Jacob (4 of his sons named a son Jacob), Jacob-3rd second son of John. On another note, a Jacob Croy lived in the Annville area of Lebanon County, PA in 1795-1800-brother to Ester Croy, wife of Adam Hamburger.TMI.Let me know if you can get deeper and document! So difficult in the 18th century.

      Reply

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