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Why Apply to Lineage Societies? Five Good Reasons

Richard Croy marriage 1839

An outcome of applying to lineage societies was discovering what happened to Richard Croy and Rachel Crist after their marriage.

I completed my applications to two lineage societies of the Ohio Genealogy Society yesterday (well, almost). The Societies are the First Families of Ohio and the Families of the Old Northwest Territory. Last year I waded into this world by applying and being accepted into The Society of Civil War Families of Ohio. The process is rigorous, requires extensive documentation, costs money, and carries with it only the honor of membership, along with a pin and certificate. Now, I am neither a big joiner nor spendthrift. Nor do I collect pins, plaques, or certificates. So why bother? Let me count the ways.

  1. I am documenting, with certification of my work, an accurate history of family.
  2. The record is stored securely where it is available to all researchers to use for their specific current and future purposes.[i]
  3. The process hones my skills and the depth and accuracy of my propositions.
  4. I feel accomplished upon completion—a job well done (I hope).

And—bells chime and trumpet sounds…

  1. New discoveries present themselves. Doors, never seen before, open to sources yet untapped!

Here is an example from my recent venture.

I had never traced Richard Croy, son of Andrew Croy, beyond his appearance on an 1840 Federal Census for Rose Twp, Carroll Cty, OH[ii] with wife Rachel Crist[iii] and a male under 5. Then, while doing other research, I saw a family page with an interesting tree for Richard.

I delved into it and discovered a little treasure trove in Delaware County, Ohio. It seems Richard and family moved there after 1840, or Rachel traveled there after his death before 25 March 1847 when she remarried David Hodgden.[iv]

Why she only kept her daughter, Emily Jane Croy, then age 6,[v] and farmed out son John, then age 11,[vi] to the Hinkle family, and Mathias, then age 8,[vii] to the Bush family, both in Troy Township, Delaware County, we can never know. Perhaps Rachel had limited resources after Richard died, and the boys boarded as laborers for the families.

At any rate, their lives were hard and ended in the Civil War. Mathias, who served with Company F of the 96th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, died of chronic diarrhea in Louisiana on 12 June 1863.[viii] John died of scarlet fever on 9 August 1864 at Andersonville Prison. Emily Jane, who married a Wesley Overturf, lived on, and moved from Illinois, to Missouri, to Indian Territory (Oklahoma.)[ix]

Still a mystery: the exact time, place, and cause of Richard’s death. Some mysteries are never solved; but maybe when I least expect it.

[i] The Ohio Genealogical Society keeps these records on file and provides a searchable list of their names. The information is available upon request. You can even join a society by using the member # and provide documentation connecting you to any verified ancestor, thus entering your family’s documentation into the database.
[ii] Richard Croy; 1840; Census Place: Rose, Carroll, Ohio; Roll: 381; Page: 248; Image: 504; Family History Library Film: 0020160 Ancestry.com. 1840 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
[iii] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-17957-92159-97?cc=1614804 : 15 July 2014), Carroll > Marriage records 1833-1849 vol 1 > image 95 of 203; county courthouses, Ohio.
[iv] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-17962-52947-52?cc=1614804 : 15 July 2014), Delaware > Marriage records 1846-1858 vol 2 > image 33 of 316; county courthouses, Ohio.
[v] Emily Jane Croy and Rachel; 1850; Census Place: Brown, Delaware, Ohio; Roll: M432_675; Page: 300A; Image: 412 Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[vi] John Croy; 1850; Census Place: Troy, Delaware, Ohio; Roll: M432_675; Page: 287; Image: 384 Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[vii] Mathias Croy; 1850; Census Place: Troy, Delaware, Ohio; Roll: M432_675; Page: 286A; Image: 384 Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[viii] Mathias Croy; U.S., Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, compiled 1861–1865. ARC ID: 656639. Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s–1917. Record Group 94. National Archives at Washington, D.C.
[ix] based on 1870, 80, and 1900 Federal Census information

About croywright

The author, a writer of history and historical fiction, always yearned to go back in time.

One response »

  1. I like to think the boys are happy to know you followed them and their stories! Sad to think of how much this family endured.

    Reply

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