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Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part Three

Transport on the Tennessee River Taylor & Huntington

Transport on the Tennessee River
Taylor & Huntington

Imagine your 16-year-old son telling you that he is going to war. He can stand aside no longer, not while his brother fights in a war consuming the Nation. What do you say or do? If you are Jacob and Margaret Croy, it seems, you send your eldest son along to protect him. You are family. Duncan Croy, age 16, signed up for the war on the same day as his brother Robert, age 28. They volunteered for a three-year term in the 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company G, on August 5, 1862. Greer gave his age as 18. All death, census, and supporting data show his age to be sixteen at the time.[i] Robert, who would muster out as corporal, now had three children between the ages of six and two.

Now imagine these two are your brothers who are joining with another brother already serving in this historic conflict. Do you stay behind? You are young, idealistic, and you are family. William Croy, aged 25, enlisted with the same company in the 92nd only four days later, August 9, 1862. Like brothers Robert and Greer, he would muster out as a corporal. David Croy joined, at 20 years of age, on August 15, 1862. Within a ten-day period, they had all joined the war. Now only Calvin and Nathan stayed home to help their parents and watch after the families of William and Robert. [ii]

The 92nd proceeded to Gallipolis, Ohio for training with Austrian rifled muskets. By October they moved into the Kanawha Valley and into the brigade of General George Crook. With him was Greer Croy, serving in the 36th OVI.

Now the story of five brothers joins, briefly and dramatically. All five brothers now were serving in the war under the same General but in different regiments. They were dispatched by Ohio River transport to Nashville, Tennessee and then on to Carthage. In the two months spent in Carthage, they buried more than 90 men to disease.

In June they headed through endless rain to Big Springs, Tennessee. Here General John Turchin took command. A colorful and portly immigrant from Hungary, he would lead the brothers successfully through the next infamous campaign. First, though he would secure “green corn, blackberries, and fresh vegetables, speedily [eradicate] all traces of scurvy and disease contracted at Carthage…” [iii] His wife, Nadine, who followed him in battle, supported his efforts.

by Alfred Edwards Mathews

by Alfred Edwards Mathews

By September of 1863 the Army of the Cumberland had arrived in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The battles along the Georgia/Tennessee line loomed before them, ones that would tip the scale of the war.

Note: Copyright free photos from Library of Congress Prints and Photographs www.loc.gov/pictures

Next: the 36th OVI and the 92nd OVI in the Battle of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge.

[i] 1860 U.S. census, Fairfield, Washington, Ohio; Roll: M653_1048; Page: 124 Image: 251; Family History Library Film: 805048 from NARA microfilm publication accessed through ancestry.com also 1850, 1870, 1880, 1900. 1910, and death cert.
[ii] Roster Commission by authority of General Assembly, Official roster of the soldiers of the state of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 9 (Cincinnati: The Ohio Valley Pub. & Mfg. Co., 141 and 143 Race St., 1886) Books. Google.com
[iii] Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) pg 692 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M
Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.

Missouri Bound Part Four: The Tschudi/Judy Family

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United States 1819

The United States in about 1819, the same time Mary Judy and Isaac Ely moved from Kentucky to Missouri Territory.

In the last three posts, I discussed the lineage of Gillian Virginia Morris(s), my Great-great-grandmother on my grandmother’s side, including the migration of that lineage from Virginia and Kentucky to Missouri. Her parents, grandparents, and her great-grandparents on her mother’s side would call Missouri home.

 

As review:

In Part I. I provided extensive information on the Salling (Sally, Salley) family who settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia. I included evidence to support the correction of an error in the parentage of Malinda Salling, mother to Peter Philander Morris, Gillian’s father.

Part II. I detailed my attempt to determine the parentage of Thomas H. Morris(s), Gilllian’s grandfather, who also lived in Rockbridge County, Virginia. The results were inconclusive. His parentage remains a brick-wall.

Part III. I documented the Ely family who came to America in the 1700’s and settled along the Cacapehon River in what would be Hampshire County, West Virginia. I provided evidence of the movement of son of Isaac Ely, Sr., Benjamin Ely, and his family, to Clark County, Kentucky, as well as proof of the Clark County marriage of his son Isaac Ely and Mary Judy. They were Gillian’s great-grandparents.

Now, what about the Judy family?

The surname “Judy” is of Swiss origin and was originally spelled Tschudi (Tschudy). The spelling morphed into “Judy” and “Judah” soon after the family arrived in America. Four men with the Tschudi name came to Philadelphia between 1740 and 1770. They included: Mardin Tschudi in 1738; Martin Tschudi in 1749, settling in Hampshire County, WV; Weinbert Tschudi in 1752.[i]

Then, my ancestor, Martin Tschudi, in the company of a Martin Nicholas Tschudi and Johann Tschudi, sailed from Rotterdam on The Sally and, after a stop in Cowes, England, disembarked on November 10, 1767.[ii] It is possible all four Tschudi’s were related. They all came from the Canton of Basel in Switzerland and many given names were the same.[iii]

According to the Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies, he arrived with wife Anna Boni and children, Johannes, Martin, Elisabeth, and Anna.[iv] A son, Jacob Judy, was born September 18, 1767, this according to information in Find-a-Grave, which would indicate he was born on the ship. Afterward, Martin and Anna had three more known children: Winepark (Weinbert), David, and Samuel.[v] Some say there was one more daughter, a Nancy but the evidence is, so far, scant.

While numerous records for a Martin Tschudi exist, there is no clear evidence of where the family resided before 1791 in Bourbon County, Kentucky.[vi] The name was common and there were at least six of that name in America in those early years. Family lore abounds regarding the “Trek” to Kentucky, but I have found little definitive evidence to support it.

The 1800, Clark County, Kentucky tax list includes Martin Sr. and his sons David, John J, Martin Jr., Samuel, and Winepack (Weinbert).[vii] So between 1767 and 1800, the family, excluding John,[viii] had settled in Clark County, Kentucky. By then Martin Jr., Mary Judy’s father, had married Elizabeth Judy. While proven in a probate record,[ix] I’ve found no marriage record.

Family Lore says she was Martin’s first cousin, but I’ve found no proof. Of various suppositions I’ve found, the most likely candidate for Elizabeth’s father is Weinbert Tschudi who arrived in Pennsylvania fifteen years before Martin., or could be the Johann Tschudi who arrived with Martin. Some have linked her to a Johannes (John) and Maria Shaffner Judy from Fort Pitt in Pennsylvania, but Lancaster, PA, Mennonite Vital Records for a couple with the same names show them married in 1808, much too late to be Elizabeth’s parents. Some family historians indicate the father of Martin Sr. in Switzerland was the one who married a cousin. I mention all this speculation because it is floating out there as fact, so I wanted the reader to be aware of it. If anyone has validating information I would love to see it!

Regardless, Martin Jr. and Elizabeth Judy had a daughter, Mary (Polly) Judy. She married Isaac Ely, in 1798, and by 1820, they had moved to Missouri.

Like an extended Abbott and Costello skit, let’s play the game of Who’s On First, only our game is Who’s in Missouri.

  • Mary (Polly) Judy and Isaac Ely arrived in Ralls County, Missouri by 1824, more likely by 1819 when Isaac’s father Benjamin is recorded as arriving.[x]
  • Malinda Salling and Thomas H. Morris(s) are in Chariton County, Missouri, by 1849.[xi]

Now for one more piece of the Who’s in Missouri puzzle: Part Five of the Missouri posts—The Utterback Family.

 Map courtesy of Library of Congress; A new and elegent general atlas, containing maps of each of the United States; Baltimore : Fielding Lucas, [1817?]
[i] Strassburger; Pennsylvania German Pioneers, Vol 1, 1727-1775; Genealogical Publishing Company; Find My Past; pages 249, 391, 507
[ii] Ibid. pg. 738
[iii] Faust, A.B. & Brumbaugh, Gaiius. Lists of Swiss emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies, Vol. 2. Washington, D.C.: the National Genealogical Society, 1925. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing co., Baltimore, 1976.
[iv] Ibid. pg. 243
[v] Various Find-a-grave resources for cemeteries in Clark County, Kentucky
[vi] Ancestry.com. Kentucky, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1810-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Kentucky Census, 1810-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.
[vii] Ancestry.com. Kentucky, Tax Lists, 1799-1801, original from: Clift, G. Glenn. Second Census of Kentucky, 1800. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co.
[viii] No definitive record until 1820 census and Find-a-grave Greene County, Ohio
[ix] Heirs of Martin Judy; Ralls county Court House, pg. 537-538; probate 15 May 1838; transcribed by N.L. Moore.
[x] Documentation to come soon, in a separate post.
[xi] Documentation provided in Part II of the Missouri posts

Missouri bound Part 3: The Ely Family heads to Kentucky

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Kentucky 1793

This map is from 1793, about the time the Ely Family moved to Kentucky. Want a close up version? You can find it at The Library of Congress Maps Division.

There is safety as well as security in numbers, and before the advent of the railroad and adequate communication systems, most families moved in groups, an important consideration when researching. The Ely, Judy, and Utterback families were no exception. As I continued cleaning up my information (in anticipation of a hiatus from fact finding to focus on fiction) the probing of proximity became my go-to tool.

First, a reminder, my current cleanup centers on the family of my great-great grandmother Gillian Virginia Morris who married Gabriel Ison. They are the parents of my grandmother Mary Elizabeth Ison. The two previous posts (Parts 1 and 2) outlined new and reviewed information on the Morris and Salling (Sally) family who ended up in Chariton and Ralls County, Missouri. Gillian’s parents were Peter Philander Morris and Elizabeth Ely. So what do we know about this Ely family?

Isaac Ely arrived in Hampshire County, (West) Virginia by 1767. He purchased a land grant from Lord Fairfax on either side of the Cacaphon (Cacapon) River at this time, this according to many genealogies providing very accurate detail. Lord Fairfax was “Baron of Cameron in that part of Great Britain called Scotland” so most of his grants were given to those loyal to him, usually of Scottish descent. I have yet to find the document for this land grant. Still, Isaac’s will, which I will discuss later, verifies the information.

On or about 1777, Benjamin Ely, Isaac Ely’s only son, married Mary Scott whose father was also a landholder in Hampshire County. William Scott’s will, dated November 22, 1767, divided his estate equally between Mary and his wife Sarey (Sarah).[i] Isaac Ely witnessed the will. On February 9, 1779, Sarey and Mary transferred the rights to 96 acres on both sides of Little Cacapehon, which had been surveyed on May 22, 1755, for Mary’s father William Scott.[ii] Benjamin had also purchased 30 acres on both sides of Little Cacapehon Creek on July 29, 1778,[iii] and 426 acres on the waters of the Old Road Run and Buffaloe Gap Run on December 6, 1778.[iv]

Three important asides regarding research in general:

  1. I discovered Benjamin’s grants at the Library of Virginia website while looking for the 1767 purchase under the NECK… Never underestimate the value of the University of Virginia site for VA research. It is invaluable.
  2. The Ohio Genealogical Society offered a one-year FREE subscription to Find My Past to all members. The more sites to search the better. Have I told you lately how much I love OGS?
  3. The New Newberry Library Atlas of Historical County Boundaries is back on-line. This fabulous interactive resource helped me determine the following Bourbon County/Clark County link.

By 1791, based on the Kentucky Early Census Index, Benjamin Ely move his family to Bourbon County, Kentucky. It is no wonder that his father gave 1/3 of his Hampshire County Estate to his wife Sarah, a sum of 10 pounds to his only son Benjamin, and the rest of his estate to William, IF he stayed on the Hampshire land grant. It was William alone who registered his grandfather Isaac Ely’s will in the county court on February 15, 1796, soon after his death.[v]

The 1800 Kentucky Tax List includes Benjamin Ely on the Clark County rolls as well as Isaac Ely. This Isaac was Benjamin’s oldest son next to William. Isaac was also his grandfather’s namesake and my 3x great grandfather. He had just married a Mary Polly Judy in 1798.

Finding the October 13, 1798, marriage record for Isaac Ely and Mary Judy[vi] was a major accomplishment—well, actually it was pure serendipity. While painstakingly sifting through the Clark County, Kentucky records for 1798 one-by-one, I discovered it, with oddly spelled surnames.Mary Juda and Isaac Raly marriage 1798 copy

On another note of serendipity, my own nearly marriage of nearly 47 years began on October 13th just like Isaac and Mary Polly Judy Ely.

The Ely family and the Judy family lived just miles apart, both in Clark County. As I’ve said many times, place matters.

Next week: the Judy family and the Ely family’s move to Missouri.

Meanwhile, I’ve completed my update to the Morris(s), Ely, Judy, and Utterback family sheets. You can find them here and on the new Convergence on Missouri tab at the top of the page.

[i] William Scott will, 22 November 1767 image 1037-8 Wills; Author: Hampshire County (West Virginia). Clerk of the County Court; Probate Place: Hampshire, West Virginia Ancestry.com. West Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1724-1985 [2017]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
[ii] http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=94&last=&g_p=GR&collection=NN Grant
[iii] http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=315&last=&g_p=GQ&collection=NN Grant
[iv] http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=70&last=&g_p=GR&collection=NN Grant
[v] Isaac Ely will, posted 15 February 1796 image 1037-8 Wills; Author: Hampshire County (West Virginia). Clerk of the County Court; Probate Place: Hampshire, West Virginia Ancestry.com. West Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1724-1985 [2017]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
[vi] Isaac Raly and Mary Juda Marriage 13 October 1798 image 90; Kentucky County Marriages, 1797-1954 FamilySearch database with images; Madison County Courthouse, Richmond.

Missouri Bound: Out of Rockbridge County, Virginia Part I

salling-estate-newspaper-article

I was Just Plain Wrong

In my New Year’s quest to review all my family records for accuracy, I turned to my grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Ison’s ancestry. Her parents Gabriel Ison and Gillian (Gillie) Virginia Morris(s) married in Missouri.[i] Gillie was the daughter of Peter Philander Morris and Elizabeth Ely.[ii] I’ll delve into the Ison, Morris, and Ely family history and how they came to Missouri in later posts. This is just Part I of my efforts to rectifying any abuses of the following rules of genealogical research:

  1. Never rely on another researcher’s family tree without looking for documentation.
  2. Always back-up your work with documentation or a triangulated proof.
  3. Use “Find-a-grave” for information on photographed and marked graves only. Otherwise refer to #1.

Gillie’s father Peter Philander Morris was the son of Thomas H. Morris and Malinda Salling.[iii] In previous posts I stated Malinda’s father to be George Salling, right family wrong sibling. This post repairs that error and provides just a smattering of amazing information I’ve discovered as I researched her ancestry.

Malinda Salling was born to Peter Salling and Rebecca Holms[iv] on March 19, 1803 (ca).[v] How do I know this? Because I just finished analyzing 1,126 pages of Chancery documents available at the Library of Virginia website.

An aside: I find Chancery documents in which inheritance issues, often complex, are ironed out, often over extended periods of time to be the genealogical mother lode. If you have any Virginia ancestors, check out this site. http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/?_ga=1.224291475.920046502.1485978183

Let’s Start at the Beginning with the Patriarch: John Peter Salling

John Peter Salling arrived in Pennsylvania in 1733 with wife Anna Maria Vollmar and children Elizabeth and Anna Catharina. [vi] On 14 November 1735, he filed a warrant for 250 acres of land on Conestoga Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.[vii]

Then: “In the year 1740, I came from Pennsylvania to the part of Orange County now called Augusta; and settled in a fork of the James River close under the Blue Ridge Mountains of the West side, where I now live.”[viii]

This passage comes from John Peter’s recollections of his capture by Indians, his transfer into the hands of the French, and his eventual recovery by the British Navy and his return to “Charles Town.” (For more on his crazy adventure go to the link cited in endnotes.) An Index of his will names one son besides the daughters who came from Northern Alsace (Germany) with him, that son is George Adam Salling.[ix]

The Family of George Adam Salling

From the Chancery Document of Augusta County, Virginia, we know that George Adam Salling of Orange County, North Carolina bought and transferred a warrant for 200+ acres to George Salling on the first bend of the James River.[x] Biographical information in A History of Rockbridge County says George Adam moved to North Carolina about 1760. He must have returned to Rockbridge or was simply cleaning up old warrants, as his will is recorded in August County (the land in what would be Rockbridge County, VA). It provides for the same 200+ acres for George and is “proved” 1 June 1789, about a year after George Adam Sallings death.

The Chancery records include an incomplete copy of the will of George Adam Salling, 1788. It lists his male offspring: Henry, Peter, and George. He leaves use of the meadow and the house to his wife Hannah along with the use of Henry’s portion of the plantation until he reaches maturity. He declares that the plantation at the fork of the James and North Rivers with three hundred sixty odd acres and meadow be divided equally between sons Henry and Peter (the quality of the division the reason for the dispute). He gives two hundred twenty acres to son George. With wife Hannah to “support that part of my unmarried children who may chuse to continue with her and likewise to give them the necessary schooling.”[xi]

The above statement indicates additional children. Virginia marriage bonds are family affairs, often listing the parentage of both bride and groom. I was able to add Magdalen, Elizabeth, Peggy, and Hannah.[xii] George Salling who married Matilda 19 January 1791 and moved to Gate City, Scott county, Virginia between 1810 and 1820. (This is the George I incorrectly designated as Malinda’s father.)

Thanks to the extraordinary effort of Marilyn Headley and Angela Ruley. They digitalized the Rockbridge County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1801. A great resource, http://www.usgwarchives.net/va/rockbridge/license.html

The Children of Henry and Peter Salling

For this portion, let me introduce you to Peter A. Salling, the son of Peter Salling, and he had a mission: to acquire the whole of the estate of George Salling. He and his wife, Aurelia Paxton had no children aside from Aurelia’s neice whom they adopted. It seems tradition was important to Peter A., so he left his substantial estate to his namesake nephew, Peter A. Salling.

rockbridge-county-detailThe “Mrs Salling” at the Fork of the James and North River is Aurelia, the last owner of the Salling Plantation.

The ins and outs of his complicated acquisitions and the dispersals at his and Aurelia’s death led to four separate Chancery filings over fifty years. From these records we know:

  • Henry Salling (of George) married Lucy and had children: Lucy, Mary Polly, Hannah, Magdalene, George Jackson, Lavinia, Henry, and Benjamin. Henry died in 1834.[xiii]
  • Peter Salling (of George) married Rebecca Holms and had children: John, Rebecca wife of William Harrison, Malinda wife of Thomas H Morris (Happy Dance!), and Mary Ann deceased who had children by a Goodwin (George W., Harriet wife of William Wasky, Peter A (the namesake), Robert B, John, and Rebecca wife of David Ely who died after her Grandfather Peter who died in 1839[xiv]

As you can imagine, the 1, 126 pages of information holds gems galore. One page of interest lists the names of Negros to be distributed to the heirs as exchange for their share of plantation land. Thomas H. Morris, Malinda’s husband, took his share in slaves.[xv] slave-dist-morrisInsights into farming, husbandry, life in Texas, and changes brought by the Civil War comes to life in these pages. I can only say—again—if you have any ancestors in Virginia and know the county of origin, check out the Library of Virginia.

Next week: Thomas H. Morris and who moved to Missouri…

[i] Marriage License of Gabriel Ison and Gillian Morris Ancestry.com. Missouri, Marriage Records, 1805-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007. Original data: Missouri Marriage Records. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm.
[ii] Census record of Peter P. Morris Year: 1870; Census Place: Township 55 Range 19, Chariton, Missouri; Roll: M593_768; Page: 362B; Image: 63785; Family History Library Film: 552267 Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[iii] Peter Philander Morris Death Certificate #9537 (T.H. Morris and Malinda Salling parents)
[iv] Peter Salling/Rebecca Holms marriage bond 9 April 1787, Rockbridge County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1801, digitalized at http://www.usgwarchives.net/va/rockbridge/license.html
[v] Malinda H. Morris Find A Grave Memorial# 37019534, Brunswick City Cemetery, Brunswick Township, Chariton County, Missouri.
[vi] Burgert, Annette K. Eighteenth Century emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America. Camden, ME: Picton Press, 1992. Pg. 416; Ancestry. Com. U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index.
[vii] Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data: Warrant Applications, 1733-1952. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania State Archives.
[viii] The Journal of John Peter Salling, transcribed by L.S. Workman from The Annals of an American Family by E. Wadell http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/augusta/misc/m-sal01.txt
[ix] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Land, Marriage, and Probate Records, 1639-1850. Orignial data: Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1965. Originally published in 1912. NOTE: I did not find this record in the Library of Virginia Chancery Records.
[x] Index # 1818-104, Augusta Co. Henry Salling vs. Peter Salling. Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Chancery Record Index, pg. 68.
[xi] Ibid. pg 27.
[xii] Rockbridge County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1801. All found under “M”
[xiii] Index # 1840-028, Rockbridge Co. Peter A. Salling vs. heirs of Henry Salling. Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Chancery Record Index, pg. 3.
[xiv] Index # 1841-019, Rockbridge Co. John Salling vs. heirs of Peter Salling. Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Chancery Record Index.
[xv] Ibid pg 27

ON THE ROAD (Part 2) Coshocton County

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DSCN0203I stand at the remnants of the Ohio-Erie Canal in Coshocton County, Ohio near the restored old Roscoe Village, a dogwood and redbud dotted treasure through which the Walhonding and Tuscarawas rivers flow and join to become the Muskingum. Coshocton County was home, at one time or another between the 1820’s and 1880’s, to my great grandfather and his parents and grandparents, my great grandmother and her parents and grandparents, AND my great grandmother’s husband’s family. Wow!

So yesterday I spent the day at the Coshocton County Library in Coshocton, Ohio. The library spawned library-envy in me, as it would in all my Friends of the Auberry Library family. A long span of oak pillared, carved oak trimmed alcoves with a naturally lit reading corner at one end and a great family history collection at the other greeted me, as did a fabulous staff.

After seven hours, I had found clues to a brick wall (begging research when I return), excellent books for each township mapping the graveyards, and a reminder of how much I dislike microfilm. But in one of the graveyard books someone threw in a treasure.[i] Here is an excerpt, and there is more…this is just a piece.

“The first [mill] was located on the Ed Steiner farm, one mile north of Avondale, now Fresno. It was built in 1832 by Thomas Diehl and had an undershot wheel sixteen (16) feet in diameter and about three (3) feet wide… Its two stories towered above the wooded slopes of historic White Eyes creek and stood on a foundation 32 x 40 feet…The mill was purchased by Andy Croy, father of the late David Croy in 1839 and operated by him for 16 years.”

My finds will require some contemplation and additional research, but I will write about them when I can find time for both. Meanwhile, after a last bit of Coshocton grave and land hopping, I take what I’ve learned and drive back in time to Stark and Carroll County where the first known Jacob Croy and his wife, Mary Huston Croy arrived, probably by 1798.

[i] White Eyes Township, Coshocton County: Cemeteries…, Coshocton County Chapter, OGS, P.O. Box 128, Coshocton, Ohio, Pg 174: housed at the Coshocton County Library, Family History Collection.

Three of the Best Sites on Self-publishing (and three reasons I just might do it)

Beginning a New Adventure

     Beginning a New Adventure

I finished my first book of historical fiction, a story pulled from my own family’s history, a theme likely obvious to those following this blog. The book chronicles the life of a young woman, Mary Hutton, who struggles with frontier life as our nation pushes into Ohio territory. At the same time it explores her connection to an older woman, in this century, searching for Mary in the annals of history. (The autobiographical part, I guess.)

My point is this: I want to publish the book. I like it. It matters to me. I want to share it. But the question is how? Do I take the traditional route (agents, publishing companies, etc.) or opt to self-publish. I’ve talked with my writing friends, scoured the Internet, and soul searched. I am now leaning to self-publishing. There are cons to self-publishing, of course, but here are three reasons I’m considering it.

First reason to self-publish? I’ve waded into the publishing waters already. While not at a level I anticipate with my novel, I have written a family history and a history of our home, both for personal consumption only (though much of the family history is available on the pages of my website.) I used Bookemon for the first book. http://www.bookemon.com  I chose that company because it accepted my formatting, no reformatting necessary. It worked well and I was happy with the results. With the second book, I used Blurb and was able to include an e-book with a simple click of a button. http://www.blurb.com This book was primarily a picture book, and I particularly liked the fact that I was not tied to any template but could create as I went.

Another reason to self-publish? I do this mostly out of love and want to publish for the joy and accomplishment of it. Yes, I’d take recognition if it came, and money certainly, but that isn’t the rational for my writing. I don’t need a publishing company’s stamp of approval, nor do I need to see the book in a bookstore.

Final reason? I’m impatient. The process of finding an agent and then a publisher, excluding the publication process, is multi-year. Can I wait that long? Life is short.

I thought there might be interested in the sites I’ve found to be useful in my research. Here are three of the best of them.

Amazon is the king (and queen) of self-publishing due the breadth of its marketing coverage. It is foolish to ignore them. (They even opened a brick and mortar bookstore recently.) Deborah Jacobs wrote a detailed article on the world of Amazon self-publishing. It is a worthy read.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahljacobs/2014/04/25/how-to-self-publish-your-book-through-amazon/ Note: I tried using this link but Forbes very cleverly sends you to a home page rather than going directly to the article. I recommend you use either their search engine or another like Google and input the title and author listed in the link.

Amazon is not the only big fish in the self-publishing world. In fact, it pays to be strategic. Jane Friedman published an article on her site recently that outlined key player. I consider it excellent, as are most of her articles. I subscribe and recommend it for anyone who dares to write. https://janefriedman.com/self-publish-your-book/

The Alliance of Independent Authors is a global non-profit for writers who self-publish. It shares advice ranging from editing to marketing, and everything in between. I’ve yet to even skim the surface of the site. http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org

Whether you envision a readership that can fit around the Thanksgiving table or plan a tome for the masses, resources abound. Other self-publishing issues need consideration including quality in editing, cover design, and formatting. And what about going local with publishing, or building readership? The information is out there, lots of it, but I’ll leave you with the sites listed above for now. As I wade deeper in, I’ll share more.

Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part Five

Sheridan's Ride at Cedar Creek October 19, 1864 by A.R. Waud

Sheridan’s Ride at Cedar Creek
October 19, 1864 by A.R. Waud

The five Croy boys who fought together on the Western Theatre received new orders. After taking Missionary Ridge in Tennessee and securing the supply lines and strategic placement of Chattanooga, the 92nd with Robert, William, Duncan, and David Croy moved south with Sherman. Having completed the three-year obligation to serve, the 36th was due to disband. They moved north, returning to Ohio.

The Union desperately needed these volunteers to reenlist. They were transported to Columbus where Governor John Broughin garlanded them with acclaim. He also explained an incentive plan. If a significant percent of the regiment reenlisted, they would be honored with the title of “veteran” for their regiment and each man reenlisting would receive a $100 bonus. They squeaked by with the required percentage. On February 15, 1864 329 men were sworn into the 36th Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Among them was Greer Croy.

As part of the “negotiations,” the 36th received two out of the three things they requested. They would receive a 30-day leave to rest and visit family. They would not receive the Spencer repeating rifles they had seen in use in Tennessee. They would be transferred to serve under George Crook, now Brigadier General of the Kanawha Division of West Virginia.

When Greer Croy arrived home for his thirty days of recuperation in March of 1864, he was greeted by a proud father, relieved and still anxious mother, and two awed brothers, all of them bursting with their own questions. By the time Greer left to join Crook in West Virginia on March 29, 1864, his presence had convinced the last two brothers that they could wait no longer. Well, maybe he had only convinced Calvin. Calvin was young and filled with stories of adventure, and he turned eighteen years of age on May 13th. A regiment formed in that month, but mother Margaret would not send another boy off alone.

On May 2, 1864, Calvin and Nathan Croy, 20 years of age, joined the newly forming 148th OVI for a 100 day term.[i]Their service began in disaster. Barely out of Ohio, the train carrying the boys crashed. It killed a local boy in the regiment and injuring many. Calvin and Nathan went on to Washington, D.C. to man the trenches protecting the Capital. They were mustered out on September 14, 1864. Later Calvin would join his brothers in the 92nd marching through the Carolinas. But for one hundred days all seven of Margaret and Jacob’s boys were in the Civil War together.

At the same time, Crook and Greer’s 36th had received orders to destroy the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Traveling light, living off the land, with orders to do no “indiscriminate marauding,” they marched through rain and mud along the Kanawha River, disrupting supply flow and creating havoc for the Confederacy. With the Battle of Cloyd’s Mountain in Virginia, they accomplished the shut down that railroad and moved up the Shenandoah Valley.

Lacking supplies and equipment while battling heat, fatigue, and the guerilla tactics of the Rebels, they lingered on the verge of collapse. Then, in August of 1864, Major General Philip Sheridan arrived with 35, 000 troops. They rallied.

The culminating battle came at Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864. Thinking they now dominated the valley and the front, Sheridan had moved out to focus on Lee. But Major General Early of the Confederacy surprised the Union forces, causing general panic. The 36th held the line, and Sheridan, with word of the danger, returned to rally the troops. Many depict the moment as the now famous, if somewhat overly dramatic, “Sheridan’s Ride.”

There were 5,700 casualties at Cedar Creek with 554 killed. Greer Croy suffered his third and final wound of the war. He was mustered out to go home on March 18, 1865 with a surgeon’s certificate of disability.

Note: For further information http://www.ohiocivilwar.com (regiment timelines and other interesting facts) http://www.ohiocivilwar150.org/omeka/ (flags of regiments.) http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com (excellent outline of battles, regiments, etc.) and Kenneth P. Werrell, Crook’s Regulars: the 36th Ohio in the War of Rebellion (Christianburg, Virginia, KPW, 2012)

[i] NARA. U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 (Ancestry.com) T288_105, also Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) pg 755-756 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M (Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.)

 

Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part Two

Greer Croy in the 36th OVI during 1861 through 1862 image: by Google earth: landmarks placed by author

Greer Croy in the 36th OVI during 1861 through 1862
image: by Google earth: landmarks placed by author

Margaret kissed her first soldier boy, Greer Croy, good-bye in August of 1861.[i]Jacob surely approved. He prided himself in love of country and service to his fellowman. Greer headed for Parkersville where the 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI) was already training. They drilled with ancient muskets that, in a rare practice session, the soldiers discovered were nearly useless. They considered the leadership useless as well. They moved to Summersville, West Virginia in October of 1861 where they endured diseases including typhus and pneumonia that killed over forty men.They also picked up Enfield rifles, the leadership of Colonel George Crook, and the confidence he and his drilling infused. From October of 1861 through the early part of 1862, they fought a guerilla war with the “bushwackers” who hid in the “bushes” of the Virginias. The men hated it.[ii]

Finally, following a plan formulated by Major General John Fremont, they engaged in their first major battle at Lewisburg, Virginia in May of 1862. They surprised the rebels. In the rout the 36th lost 7 men and the rebels, 60. “…the wounded who were straggling back were ill treated; one shot dead by a citizens.”[iii]

One can imagine Greer Croy being among those greatly upset by these snipers. Colonel Crook managed to temper talk of burning Summersville to ashes and limited the angry retaliation to three homes. The savages of war unleashed, the 36th move on to two significant battles of the war, the Second Bull Run and Antietam.[iv]

At the end of August, 1862 came the Second Battle of Bull Run. Greer’s regiment positioned itself to guard General Pope’s headquarters and rear line. Their orders were to prevent the mass desertions and retreats that occurred in the first Bull Run. In this severe defeat, the 36th saw no combat but worked “arresting stragglers and fugitives from the battle.” [v]

The Battle of Groveton or Second Bull Run by Edwin Forbes

The Battle of Groveton or Second Bull Run by Edwin Forbes

At the famous battle of Antietam, the 36th served under Major General Ambrose Burnside who was charged with taking and holding what came to be known as “Burnside’s Bridge.” The epitaph was disparaging. Due to delays, some say procrastination or indecision, huge casualties occurred there. Crook himself made a major error and arrived with the 36th late and not at, but above, the bridge. Because of this, the 36th was less effective but suffered fewer casualties. One of the wounded was Greer Croy. As part of the color guard, he was particularly vulnerable. With the rest of his comrades, he waited and listened to the overnight cries of the other wounded. Antietum proved one of the costliest battles of the war. Neither side could convincingly claim victory. Meanwhile, to be covered in the next post, brothers Robert, William, David, and Duncan had just joined the Union cause.

Union soldier examining graves at "Burnside's Bridge"

Union soldier examining graves at “Burnside’s Bridge” by Alexander Gardner September 21, 1862

Note #1: Drawing and photograph come from the Library of Congress digital collection: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/civwar
Note #2: Because of copyright issues, I cannot show the flags carried by Greer Croy or the ones that flew above the 92nd OVI. This excellent site shows them all.http://www.ohiocivilwar150.org/omeka/ Also, for additional Ohio Civil War information, this site by Larry Stevens: http://www.ohiocivilwar.com
[i] Each of the Croy brother’s documentation cross-referenced with information found in National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 (database accessed through Fold.com) T288 roll 105
[ii] Kenneth P. Werrell, Crook’s Regulars: the 36th Ohio in the War of Rebellion (Christianburg, Virginia, KPW, 2012) Note: Most of the detail of the 36th comes from this excellent, self-published book.
[iii] Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) pg 755-756 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.
[iv] Roster Commission by authority of General Assembly, Official roster of the soldiers of the state of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 3 (Cincinnati: The Ohio Valley Pub. & Mfg. Co., 141 and 143 Race St., 1886) p. 669 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL7041537M Note: Volumes include list of battles participated in by the regiment and brief account of each soldier’s enlistment date, age at enlistment, length of enlistment, and discharge date, rank, and circumstances.
[v] Werrell, Crook’s Regulars, pg 53

 

Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part One

The Marietta Register, Thurs., June 20, 1872, pg. 3, col. 4

The Marietta Register, Thurs., June 20, 1872, pg. 3, col. 4

Today I begin the tale of my family in the Civil War. I consider it dangerous territory. Many historians, both amateur and professional, have devoted years to understanding even a single battle. Information abounds regarding the Civil War and I claim no expertise in its history. With that disclaimer, I begin a story of seven brothers. All served, as Jacob’s obituary shown above states, in the Civil War at one time. In point of fact, they all served together for only 100 days from May 2, 1864 to September 14, 1864. The story is no less amazing. And it begins with what the family seemed to do regularly. It begins with a move.

By 1860 Jacob Croy, wagon maker, and Margaret Pugh Croy, my great, great grandparents, had moved from Coshocton County, Ohio to Fairfield Township, Washington County, Ohio. They settled not far from Marietta, a booming port on the Ohio River. Seven sons and 3 daughters traveled with them. Sons Robert and William brought families. Robert and wife, Emily, had two children, Stanton, age 4, and Joseanna, age 2. William and his wife, Rebecca, had a 5-year-old son, Anderson. The three families lived side-by-side working a farm in Fairfield Township.[i]

It was a turbulent time. Lincoln narrowly won the presidency within months of the 1860 census. One by one, southern states seceded from the Union. At 4 am, April 12, 1861 cannon shots erupted over Fort Sumter in South Carolina and the Civil War began. Marietta became a major staging site to protect the important supply line of the Ohio River, its canals and railways, and for recruitment of Ohio Volunteers. On July 21, 1861, the Union Army suffered a devastating loss at The Battle of Bull Run, and President Lincoln, facing the reality of that loss, called for a half million volunteers.

On October 12, 1861, young Greer (Grier/Grear) Croy volunteered for a three-year term. Single and 23 years old,[ii]  he joined the 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a regiment that would fight on both the western and eastern fronts of the war and participate in many of its major battles. He would be wounded three times while carrying the colors of his regiment and the Nation, reaching the rank of “color” corporal.[iii]

 [i] 1860 Census: Fairfield, Washington, Ohio: Roll: M653_1048; Page: 124; Image: 251; Family History Library Film: 805048 Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=42575018
[ii] Note: no birth certificate as yet found and date of birth fluctuates from 1842 grave marker, 1836 approx. date given at enlistment, and 1839 dates for census of 1850, 1860, and 1840 date from census of 1870
[iii] Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) Pgs 755-756 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.

 

 

“The family became widely scattered.” Part 5

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The Huston Sisters’ Journey: Rachel and Sarah [i]

Rose Township, Section 17, Site of Morges, Ohio

Rose Township, Section 17, Site of Morges, Ohio from US Indexed Early Land Ownership and Township Plats

As I mentioned in the previous post, by 1800 three Huston sisters had migrated with their husbands to what would be Rose Township, Stark County, Ohio. Mary and Rachel would lean heavily on Sarah when, within a ten year period, they both lost their husbands.  One remarried and the other maintained her independence, but both would need a comforting hand and thoughtful heart. Mary’s husband, Jacob Croy died soon after recording his land grant at the Stubenville Land Office on August 2, 1805. He may have made the trip to Stubenville once again, this time with Sarah’s husband, Jacob Oswalt. Their friendship had flourished in Pennsylvania, and their families were close, very close. Perhaps their adult sons, Andrew Croy, young Jacob Croy, and Samuel Oswalt, joined them on the fifty-mile journey. For sure though, Jacob laid claim to Section 12, Township 16, Range 7 in Stubenville on September 24, 1805, barely two months after Jacob Croy. [ii] Meanwhile, Rachel’s husband, Isaiah McClish, never appears on any records for Rose Township. He, like Jacob Croy, died early, before 1818. [iii] By 1820 Rachael McClish appears independently on the census records, a sure indication that she was widowed or abandoned. The US census only began recording the names of women and children in 1850. She was still widowed and living in Rose Township in 1840, not far from Sarah. Andrew Croy, son of Sarah’s sister Mary, had married Sarah’s daughter Susanna and stayed close to the family. He purchased the southeast quarter of section 17, Township 16, Range 7 on April 2, 1829.[iv] By this time, Jacob and Sarah Oswalt were over sixty years of age.[v] They began thinking of their families’ futures. Meanwhile, the American Dream dangled before every eye. Land was plentiful, undeveloped, and in demand. The new settlers both required goods and longed to profit from producing, selling, and transporting them. The canal system connecting the Great Lakes was conceived as the two Jacobs registered their land grants. By 1817 construction on the Erie Canal began and was completed in 1825. Ohio men of vision, including Jacob Oswalt’s brother Michael[vi], began planning canals to connect the Erie and the Ohio River. Towns sprang up everywhere out of both necessity and hope. The town of Morges in Rose Township grew from the dreams of Samuel Oswalt and John Wagonner.[vii]  By 1828 Wagonner had purchase Jacob Oswalt’s section, the one he claimed in 1805. The funds from that purchase probably financed the Oswalt portion of the gamble called Morges, platted in 1831. The two men relied heavily on family to further the project, but the direction of commerce can shine or tarnish a dream.  Ohio’s star would shine elsewhere in the state.Morges Marker

References:

[i] Direct Ancestors: Jacob Oswalt and Sarah Huston Oswalt (child- Susanna), 7th gen. Jacob Croy and Mary Huston Croy (child-Andrew), 7th gen. Andrew Croy and Susanna Oswalt Croy 6th gen.
[ii] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Township Plats of Selected States; Series#; T1234; Roll: 50 from Public Land Survey Township Plats, compiled 1789-1946 Records of Bureau of Land Management (Ancestry. Com. U.S., Indexed Early Land Ownership and Township Plats, 1785-1898 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.)
[iii] Will and Probate Dispute ADD
[iv] Ancestry.com U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907[database on-line] Provo, UT, USA:Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008 Original data: United States. Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records. Automated Records Project: Federal Land Patents, State Volumes. http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/ Springfield, Virginia: Bureau of Land Management, Eastern States, 2007
[v] 1830 US Census: Census Place: Rose, Stark, Ohio: Page: 206; NARA Series: M19; Roll Number: 140; Family History Film: 0337951 Source Info: Ancestry.com 1830 United States Federal  Census NOTE: by error recorded as Lexington Township.
[vi] Letter to Thomas Rotch from Michael Oswalt dated Jan. 9, 1818 re: canal connecting the Eerie to “the hed waters of the Tuscaraurs branch of muskingum River…” Archive # B-133-1, records of P McHenry, private holding
[vii] Karen Gray, Rose Township, Carroll county, Ohio (September 2008) pg. 4, http://www.carollcountyohio.com/history/townships/Rose/Final%20Rose%20History.pdf