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A Deep Dig into the Town of Morges, Ohio

Morges Marker

You’ve checked the tax records for your ancestor OR you found a deed confirming ownership—you’re done right?They lived there; it’s clear. Okay, asking the question and answering so unequivocally was a dead give away. Nope. You aren’t done. You need to check both taxes and deeds.

DON’T ASSUME YOUR ANCESTOR LIVED ON THE LAND DEEDED TO HIM OR OWNED THE LAND WHERE HE PAID TAXES.

Samuel Oswalt, the brother of my 3x’s great-grandmother, Susannah Oswalt Croy, established the little town of Morges, Ohio, in 1831. You’ll also notice by the sign above that Jacob Waggoner, Jr. is, likewise, a town founder.

I wanted to find the original deeded document for the formation of the town of Morges. I also hoped to find Andrew Croy’s original deed for his Morges property, and maybe those of other ancestors living on lots there. Previously, I had documented all those living in Morges using the only surviving early tax records, 1833-1838.(Some wise soul rescued these few records from the waste pile during a courthouse purge.) Andrew Croy, Susannah Oswalt’s husband, appeared on the tax records for Morges, lot #18, from 1833 through 1838. Jacob Croy, his son, was listed on lot #17, 1833-1835. Numerous Croys and Oswalts littered the list.

By using the on-line digitalized courthouse records available through familysearch.com, I had already found one deed in which Samuel Oswalt corrected an error of location for the town of Morges.I, likewise, located a deed transferring lot #18 from Andrew and Susan/Susannah to a John Zengler in 1848. But they weren’t the originals. I found no deed for Jacob Croy.

So who owned all of the thirty-seven Morges lots? The deeds, in Stark County (the town’s home county until 1832) and Carroll County (its home from 1832 forward), were not searchable. They required that I locate names in indexes—both alphabetized and not—then go to the indicated page. Let the treasure hunt begin.

Morges,_Ohio_map_1874

Plat Map of Morges, Ohio 1874

As I searched for the deeds using the individuals named on the tax records, Inoticed something perplexing. The property tax records and ownership records did not coincide. Why not, I asked? Land ownership and property tax should match up, shouldn’t they? The answer? Well, not necessarily.

Early taxation did not always distinguish between personal (movable) and real (immovable) property.An example is my 5x great-grandfather, Jacob Oswalt’s 1779, Bedford County tax record which taxed real property like land, grist mills, saw mills, and distilleries, along with movable goods like servants, negroes, merchandise, horses, horned cows, and sheep.[i]

Even when property was taxed separately from movable goods, determining the owner of property wasn’t always easy.A tax assessor traveling the countryside did not have immediate access to deeds nor were they always recorded with the county.[ii]The assessor often relied on those living on the land for their information.

In Morges, though Samuel Oswalt often owned much of the property, the person living on it (most often a relative) often paid the tax.For those who have an interest in the little town of Morges, a compilation of my research by lot, with occupants and owners can be found here. Morges, OH Tax and deed Records. It’s a work in progress; I’ll update it regularly.Briefly, here are my bulleted discoveries. Eight lots are still a mystery.

  • By the 1840’s (a timespan of about 10 years) Samuel Oswalt and John Waggoner, Jr. owned few of the lots.The Fetters (Casper, Joseph, and Jacob) owned 10 lots, Frederick Harple owned 5, John Zengler owned 4, Stephen Rennniar owned 4, and Abraham Fredrick owned 2. (25 of the lots)
  • Samuel Oswalt originally owned (and/or sold) at least 22 of the 37 lots.
  • John Waggoner bought two lots from Samuel Oswalt and likely owned 3 more.
  • I found no evidence that the following individuals listed on the tax records owned lots.[iii]Mathias or Peter Waggoner, Thomas Simonton, Henry Casselman, Daniel Wymer, John Oswalt, Michael Croy, or Jacob Croy, all related in some way to Samuel.

Two WOWS!I found the transfer of land from Jacob Oswalt to Samuel and John Oswalt on November 17, 1827,[iv]along with the transfer of land from John Waggoner, Sr. to John, Jr. on February 25, 1826.[v]Thus the seeds for the town of Morges were sown.

I also discovered the transfer of land from John Waggoner, Jr. to the Bishop of Cincinnati.[vi]This deeded donation was the beginnings of St. Mary’s Catholic Church located in Morges and pictured below.morges

I never found the original Stark County record filed by Samuel Oswalt for the town of Morges, though I found many deeds in which he sold lots to others.The exact page of the entry—“which is recorded in deed book J, page 417, in the recorder’s office for the county of Stark”—was provided in a correction to the town location on August 21, 1832.[vii]But, look as I might on the exact page (and in books I in case I read it incorrectly, I couldn’t find it. Any help out there?Looks like I might need to go to Canton.

I also never located my 3x great-grandfather’s original lot 18 deed. A later deed in which he sells the property for $12 to a John Zengler, recorded on May 9, 1848, indicates it is housed at the Stark County Courthouse[viii], but I couldn’t find it in the on-line records for Stark County found at Familysearch.com. Another reason to go to Canton, I suppose.

I keep finding more and more reasons for that next trip to Ohio. Oh, darn!

[i]As time passed, Bedford County tried to track land ownership by indicating who had a warrant to the land or a deed and who was simply living on the land, a difficult business in the wilds of Pennsylvania in the 1700’s.
[ii]I found examples of deed transfers, sometimes as many as 4 separate transfers with dates from the 1830’s into the 1840’s listed page after page, to complete a transfer of ownership.
[iii]The original Morges deeded record may shed more light.
[iv]Deed Records of Five Ohio Counties; 1809-1902: Columbiana and Stark Counties, Deed Records, V. 51, 1809-1834, pg. 230-234; accessed on-line through familysearch.com
[v]Deed Records of Five Ohio Counties; 1809-1902: Columbiana and Stark Counties, Deed Records, V. 51, 1809-1834, pg. 368-369; accessed on-line through familysearch.com
[vi]Deed Records of Five Ohio Counties; 1809-1902: Columbiana and Stark Counties, Deed Records, V. 51, 1809-1834, pg. 537; accessed on-line through familysearch.com
[vii]Ohio Justice of the Peace, Stark County, Volume 51, page 503; Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 2004; accessed on-line through familysearch.com.
[viii]Carroll County, Ohio, Courthouse Record of Deeds; Vol. 10, 1845-48, page 489; Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1964; accessed on-line through familysearch.com.

Off Line for a While

sling

Due to impingement and tendon repair, I’m taking a typing break for 5-6 weeks. Hunt and peck is not my thing. But before I go, got to love how nerdy excited I am to get this old book. It’s research for the next book in my head and I couldn’t find it on line.

climate book

When I return I’ll be getting ready for the Surrey International Writing Conference in Canada where I’m scheduled for a Blue Pencil Cafe session (a critique of my writing) with Diana Gabaldon! She can tell me anything…it’s 15 minutes one-on-one with Diana Gabaldon.

This short missive took all my concentration. How do hunt-and-peckers do it?

 

Researching New Haven—and a few general hints, as well

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Inside Map with scrolling

Early sketch of New Haven. Repository Yale University

My upcoming novel, The Forging of Frost, is set in 17thcentury New Haven Colony so I decided to look back at the catalyst for that novel, the family research I did on my New Haven ancestors.I am, after all, the real life version of the fictional Maggie found in my books.

I was surprised to find only one postWhy?

Well, there just aren’t many resources available, but they are extraordinarily comprehensive.Here’s what I discovered, and along the way I’ve added some hints, whether you’re doing New Haven research or not.

Hint #1: Always determine where the person(s) you are researching lived and go to FamilySearch.org.

Input the place name to search their research wiki for an overview of all available resources and the catalog to discover their library’s digital resources. I didn’t always do this and would go on random search adventures. But why?

And never think your done. While testing this article, I reviewed the resources in their catalogand found this in the Abstracts of the early probate records of New Haven compiled by Winifred S. Alcorn. Screen Shot 2018-07-15 at 1.40.00 PM

Typical of New England colonies in general, most of the New Haven information comes from copious records kept by documentation-conscious church leadership. Later, the minutes of town and colony, as well as church vital records, were unified into book form by early historians (before those three to four-hundred year old records turned to dust or were ruined by constant exposure). So what’s available?

Colonial Records: in this case the online and searchable archive.org versions.

I love these records—my book, after all, fictionalizes a handful of trials found inside. The volumes unveil New Haven’s development, dilemmas, and ultimate demise in a moment by moment manner. Included in the meeting notes are a host of family names. Some parts of the transcribed volumes are redacted due to what the editor sensitivity to what he deemed offensive content. The unredacted originals are housed in the Connecticut State Library archives.

Hint: archive.org books (digitalized by numerous contributors) are searchable.

Just make sure you use the format that looks like a book and click the magnifier to the right. (When hovered over, it says “search inside.”) Use all the possible spellings. In my case, “Payne” and “Paine” provided results, as did “Payen” in other works.

Town Records:I’ve found these extremely useful, but you usually have to work for them. FamilySearch.org has a range of them on line, but they aren’t usually searchable. Except by you—one page at a time. Luckily, a transcript of New Haven’s town records is available through archives.org.

Hint: A good sense of the time frame in which your ancestor inhabited the town helps narrow your search.

Town records include tidbits not available in the colonial records, and if your ancestors moved within the colony, research every town.

Local Town Genealogies:I’m speaking of the genealogies compiled from town vitals and other records not easily accessed, not books produced by descendants or gathered from residents for town histories that include biographies based on recollection. They are less reliable. Regardless:

New Haven has an excellent and comprehensive eight-volume set of early family records.

  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volumes 1-8,compiled by Donald Lines Jacobus, C.D. Smith, Rome, New York, 1923. While some of the volumes are available through archives.org, the most comprehensive and searchable version is through Ancestry.com $$

Hint: Always, always, check the front pages of compiled records for ABBREVIATIONS.

Screen Shot 2018-07-14 at 9.29.09 AM

Sample of abbreviations found at beginning of Ancient Families of New Haven

Don’t just guess at them. Some useful information might be over looked if you don’t know their meanings. Note the example. All of the records in Volume 6 of Families of Ancient New Haven for Samuel Payne, my 4x great grandfather, have an F by them, indicating the author drew the information from family records. (Refer to the hint below!)

Local Histories:Two examples I read on New Haven included the following searchable books found at archives.org.

Hint: Be very careful with town, county, and descendant genealogy/history books, for while they may contain information that sends you down fruitful paths, you must verify through other sources.

Historical Societies and Museums:Some are excellent repositories; some aren’t repositories at all. Some provide their resources on-line; some require a visit.

Hint: If you plan a visit, check out when they’re open.

I did, but no rearranging of my travel schedule got me to New Haven on the right day. Still, a place like the one below is wonderful about returning e-mails and helping with research, so ASK. New Haven’s best bet?

So, whether you’re searching for ancient ancestors in New Haven, New England or further afield—or just want to know more about the history of a place—check FamilySearch.org resources, use the magic of archive.org digitalized books, go deep, and keep looking.

Do you have other hints or ideas for research? Let me know in comments!

A Place on Wills Creek: A Short Story Prequel to The Scattering of Stones

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The second book in what I now dub The Maggie Chronicles will soon be ready for publication. So, to express my delight, here’s a gift to all who’ve read the first book, The Scattering of Stones, (or who might want to).

It’s a free (longish) short story about how Jacob Carter arrived up on Wills Creek.

The cover designed by Pam Mullins gives you a sneak peak at the cover style for the series. I’m so excited about it. The cover to the new book, The Forging of Frost, will have a similar look, and The Scattering of Stone’s cover gets a facelift to match! THANK YOU, PAM!

Select the link below to view the prequel!
http://online.fliphtml5.com/kmkq/nvaf/index.html

The Questions I Didn’t Ask

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The questions I didn't ask.

I almost could not use this photo. It spoke so clearly to the questions I didn’t ask. 

When The Scattering of Stones first came out, I got a phone call from an old friend offering congratulations. After some pretense at small talk—not my specialty—I asked him how he was. This was not small talk, not with this man. Joe (not his real name) is a Vietnam vet. He is also a victim of our indiscriminant use of Agent Orange. He managed a supply depot in Vietnam and handled the chemical everyday.

 

So I asked him how his heart was doing. Agent Orange, the verified culprit in his heart battles, has earned him regular disability checks. After numerous operations, too many for me to hold on my plate, he assured me he was doing “pretty well.”

Then I asked him about his throat cancer, not officially Agent Orange related. With his permanently graveled voiced, he told me that, while the disease dragged him down, things were going “pretty well.”

Joe, as you have likely perceived, is a stoic man, not one for self-pity wallows. But he had more to say. Talk turned to the cancer center where he was receiving treatment, and the intensive interview they required for admission.

They weren’t the usual questions, Joe informed me, “They were hard.”

They asked him about Vietnam. Not just the surface stuff—everything. What he did, where he went, who he met, how he felt. They wanted details. So he wrote, and a closeted world opened wide. The memories he captured were more than recollections. They documented a time that changed who he was, and retrieving them, writing them down, helped. Someone asked. And he answered. But what if no one asks?

Between my high school boy crush and the man I wisely married, two men stand out. The first was the love of my life. Yes, it sounds trite, but he is, and ever will be, exactly that. Dopamine and serotonin flowed through my veins and I was deeply (foolishly) in love.

We met soon after he returned from Vietnam. He was a medic there. I don’t recall how I know this. I don’t think I asked. I don’t know where he served; I don’t know for how long; I don’t know what happened while he was there. I never asked him. I almost asked. I considered it, briefly.

We had driven to San Francisco to visit a friend from his time in Vietnam. They stayed up late talking. and, when he crawled into his sleeping bag next to me, I tried to get close. “Not tonight,” he said. I could feel his angst. It was palpable. But “not tonight” seemed to me like “don’t ask.” So I never did.

Now, let me get honest. Looking back, I realize that for all my love of him, it was really about me. I was twenty-one, and, like Joe, the soldier battling Agent Orange, said—the questions were hard.

I was looking for fairytales. I wanted to be loved. What I didn’t get, what eluded me, was that love (not the dopamine-high version of it) comes of understanding. And to understand, you need to ask. I regret never asking. I regret never asking him many things. It kills me to realize that I burned for love of him but never really knew him. So how can I call that love?

Anyway, I said there were two men. The second came of my imperfect, broken attempt to rid my heart of the first. Leaving the first, which I somehow construed as being left, tore me apart. I was an emotional basket case pretending to be free. The second man was my maybe.

He had also recently returned from Vietnam. An artist, talented beyond measure, he showed me his sketches from overseas. They were heart-wrenching depictions. Personal. One lives forever inside me—a young Vietnamese girl, only her face, looking up with haunted eyes. It was a perfect time to talk about his time there. I let it slip away.

Recently, I reconnected. I hinted that I’d love to have coffee some time, but fell back into some old silliness and never explained why. Besides, how do you explain that you want to ask hard questions—by e-mail? And why? To close a chapter in MY life? To finish something left undone? To do it right?

Admittedly, my questions might have been (and might now be) sidestepped, evaded, or rejected as too intimate. I might have been told “not now.” I may be the wrong person to even ask. Someone with more courage—a friend, a loved one, a practitioner at a cancer center—may have posed the questions and they might have answered. I hope so. Their stories are important.

Near the end of Scattering the heroine says,

“…for the things I did not do, out of fear or ignorance or both, for all those lost opportunities, I do hope time forgives me.”

Those words didn’t come out of nowhere. So…

Tell me about the time you served. Where did you go? What did you do? What was it like? How did you feel? And how did it change you? (Not “Did it change you?” It changed you. So, how?)

I’m finally asking, now, and I’m sorry I waited.

Photo acknowledgement: Twentieth Century “Angel of Mercy” — D. R. Howe (Glencoe, MN) treats the wounds of Private First Class D. A. Crum (New Brighton, PA), “H” Company, 2nd Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, during Operation Hue City. National Archives #532484 Marine Corp photo [wikimedia.org]

 

 

 

Family Felch and a Converging on Ohio Update

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children only

FIND YOUR “REAL THING!” Here is mine:from the Williamstown records found in Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988. I am fictionalizing their story. What stories are buried in your family’s long ago time?

As promised in my previous post, I have researched and updated the now broken brick wall of Amy Felch who married Zerah Payne in Maine. They, soon after, moved to Coshocton County, Ohio, and were the grandparents of Sarah Angelina Payne Smith who married my great grandfather, Calvin Croy. Use the search box on the right to find out more about these family members and the research to back my findings.

 

I have also updated the Ohio page which can be reached at the very top of my website. I rectified an error that excluded the Pennsylvania family sheets and added what you see below.

Again, I encourage you to go beyond name searches and search the written records themselves, when available. Most of the Felch research, beyond what I discussed in the previous post, came from the Massachusetts Vital and Town Records, an accumulation of the Town and City Clerk records of MA (found on line through Ancestry and Family Search).

This information is so complete and wide ranging that I decided to take a detour. Since I knew the town of residence for Samuel and Abigail Payne while they lived in Massachusetts (Williamstown), I went to the town records themselves and found the actual longhand record of their children’s births! I’d had the indexed records for a long time, but what a treat to see the real thing!

Here are the results of my Felch family foray. 

From Massachusetts to Maine

Maine LOC 1798 copy

The Felch Family meets up with the Paynes

Here are the family sheets with births, deaths, and important detail that I have discovered so far. Any comments that help further the investigation are welcome. To err is human, and I have surely been human in my attempts. FELCH Family Sheet

The Maine Family Felch

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Maine LOC 1798 copy

SW corner of Maine, 1798. I’ve underlined key places. A. Where Jonathan and Sarah were married. B. Where Jonathan lived first. C. Where his brother, Abijah, lived. D. Where Jonathan moved in 1799 and where Zerah Payne and Amy Felch Payne married. Find full map at Library of Congress here.

I had to say STOP. With the launch of The Scattering of Stones complete, the “final” edit of book two, The Forging of Frost, nearly finished, my third book’s characters screaming their story in my ear, I turned to my heritage. I’m so glad I did.

Enter the Felch family, particularly Amy Felch. I’ve long avoided tackling the ancestry of Amy (Amey) Felch (Feltch), wife of Zerah Payne.[i] I knew she married him[ii] but had no definitive documentation of her parentage. Still, while researching book number three, a fictionalized account of Samuel Payne and wife, Abigail Graham (Grimes) Payne in Bennington County, Vermont, she kept popping to mind. So I dove in.

While the genealogy research adage—work your way back—is true, sometimes you must succumb—and work your way forward. The Memorial History of the Felch Family in America and Wales, written in 1881 by W. Farrand Felch of Columbus, Ohio, it is a wonderful, well-researched read. Find it here. (I’m a history/genealogy nerd so consider the source.)

He gives us this abbreviated tree where I’ve underlined the key ancestry.memorialhistoryo00felc_0071 chart

Amy Felch isn’t listed in the book, but one comment stood out. It was a reference to the offspring of Nathaniel Felch (Henry, Henry Jr., John) and Mary Hanks.

“Nathaniel [Jr.] had a son born at Reading (Jonathan) April 2 1762, exactly one year after his marriage, and he soon afterwards removed to Maine, where all trace is lost of his descendants; a tradition says that he settled in the center of Maine where his stalwart descendants still reside, ‘all six-footers.’”[iii]

Since Zerah Payne married Abigail Felch in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine, I thought I should investigate. From my search, I think I can, with some confidence, trace Abigail’s family history.

A tree and family sheet for Amy Felch Paynes family is in the works. Until then, I’ve expanded W. Farrand Payne’s tree, as follows:new felch tree

My rational:

  • No record of Nathaniel Felch and Molly Hammond Felch[iv] in Maine (so far) indicating they may have died before 1790 or did not make the trip to Maine. However
  • A search for Jonathan Felch shows his marriage to Sarah Appelby (Appleby, Applebee) 28 January 1784 by Matthew Merriam, pastor of the 2nd Church of Berwick, Maine. At the time he lived at Shapleigh, then Hubbardstown Plantation, Maine[v]
  • The 1790 Federal Census shows a Jona Felsh (male over 16) living in Shapleigh, York, Maine with 2 males under 16 and 3 females (one likely Sarah, the others—children Betsey and Amy). They lived next door to Hannah Felsh. (could this be the second wife widow of Nathaniel?)
  • The Maine 1799 early census index shows a Jonathan Felch in Pittston, Kennebec County, ME in 1799
  • The 1800 Federal Census shows a Jonathan Feltch (male 26-44) living in Shapleigh, York, Maine with 2 Males under 10, 2 Females under 10, 1 Female 10-15, 1 Female 16-25. (Was this Sarah? Indicating her age at marriage as 15. Jonathan would have been 38. Or, more likely a female child—see 1790—indicating Sarah’s death by 1800.) They lived next to a Samuel Feltch, see below.
  • Samuel Felch married Salley (Sarah) Bracket, both of Shapleigh 21 December 1800. (possible brother or step-brother of Jonathan—Find-a-Grave stone gives death 23 September 1836, calculated birth 1777.)
  • Jonathan Felch, residence, Pittston, was a defendant in a case of debt at the Kennebec County Supreme Judicial Court in June 1802
  • A Betsey Felch married Seth Lamb in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine on 8 November 1807
  • Zerah W. Payne and Amy Felch marry in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine on 3 May
  • The 1810 Federal Census shows a Jonathan Felch, over 45, in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine with 1 Male under 10, 1 Male 10-15, 2 Males 16-25, 2 Females 10-15, and a Female over 45. (This accounts for all but one male child from earlier accounts and all females but the two oldest, by then married. Note: the 1800 census does not account for 2 males. More research is needed to determine Jonathan and Sarah’s progeny.
  • By 1810 Amy Felch Payne (the subject of this research) and Zerah Payne had disappeared from Maine, though their first born Samuel Felch Payne lists Massachusetts as his birth place.[vi] Their next know residence is implied by an advertisement of a Zerah Payne’s shoe business placed in the Zanesville Express and Republican Standard, 14 February 1814—not quite 8 years after their marriage.

If anyone has more information, I would love to hear from you!

[i] She bore Sephronia Payne, who married Henry Smith, and bore Sarah Angelina Smith Croy (my great-grandmother and wife of Calvin Croy). Evidence listed in other posts.
[ii] Zerah W. Payne m. Amey Felch 30 May 1808 in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine. Maine Marriage Records, 1713-1922. Augusta, Maine: Maine State Archives. Ancestry.com [accessed 14 March 2018]
[iii] pg 26 of Felch book
[iv] Nathaniel Felch of Weston m Molly Hammond, 2 April 1761. Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records. Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute. Ancestry.com. [accessed 14 March 2018]
[v] New England Historic Genealogical Society. The England Historical and Genealogical Register. Boston Ancestry.com [accessed 14 March 2018} and Maine Marriage Records, 1713-1922. Augusta, Maine: Maine State Archives. Ancestry.com [accessed 14 March 2018]
[vi] Maine was part of Massachusetts in 1810, his calculated date of birth: 1860 census for Vincennes, Knox, Indiana