RSS Feed

Missouri Bound Part 5: The Utterbacks

Posted on

9-When-Harry-Met-Sally-quotes

A side note: I am neck deep in my fiction! I just finished the first edit of my upcoming American Historical Fiction novel set in Pennsylvania and Ohio after the Revolutionary War. I’m editing my second novel based on records of New Haven Colony. AND I’m researching my third, which takes place in the area around Bennington, Vermont during the American Revolution. Oh…almost forgot, I just finished a short prequel to my upcoming book #1.

I had to pull my fingers loose from my fictional world and found myself procrastinating in a whirlpool of research and digression. One thing lured me back—the chance to pull out all my plat maps to explain how Harry met Sally (well, really, how Peter met Elizabeth).

Before I can do that, however, I must get the Utterback’s to Missouri. So, with the worst of puns, I am utterly back.

The Utterback Family

The last of the pertinent families to the ancestry of Gillian Virginia Morris(s) Ison is the Utterback family. The majority of the information regarding birth, death, marriage, and progeny comes from the much-cited Utterback, William Irvin, The history and genealogy of the Utterback family in America, 1622-1937. Huntington, W. Va.: Gentry Bros. Printing Co., 1937. I cannot verify this information but admit to including it in the family sheets for Gillian’s ancestors, found here. Here is what I can verify:

  • Herman (Harmon) Otterbach (later the name was spelled Utterback) arrived in Virginia in 1714, from Musen in Westphalia, Germany. He came with his family and eleven other families. They came to work the iron mills at Fort Germanna, Virginia under the sponsorship of Governor Spotswood in 1714. By 1720, the families, disenchanted by their treatment, relocated to Germantown, Virginia.[i]
  • Herman Otterbach/Utterback came to Virginia with his sons John Philip, John, and daughters, one of which was Anna Margrete[ii]Little Fork culpepper Cty, VA Otterbach
  • Son, John Philip Utterback appeared on Rent Rolls 1751-1754, Prince William County, VA; 1764, Culpeper County, VA.
  • Henry, son of the above John Philip and father of Hankerson Utterback, died by January 1799, based on index of probate for Culpeper County, Virginia (The actual record does not exist as far as I can tell. I went through each page of the actual records and there is a huge hole for this time period. Also checked Library of VA Chancery Records for the county and neighboring counties.)

As our land gained footing a separate nation, records expanded and more research information is available. Consequently, the records for Hankerson Utterback are more numerous.

  • Hankerson Utterback shows up on the 1810 census for Boone County, Kentucky and again on the 1820 census for Burlington, Boone Cty, KY. Marriages of his children Adam (m. 1814), Joseph (m. 1823), and Elizabeth (m. 1823) are all documented for Boone County in the Kentucky Compiled Marriages on Family Search.
  • By 1827 Hankerson had moved to Clay County, Missouri[iii]and by 1828, he had bought land in Ralls County, Missouri.

So, now Hankerson Utterback and his family (I’ve found records for Adam, Joseph, George, Rebecca, Abraham, Elizabeth, and Emily) have made it to Missouri. (I seem to always set myself down in the past like it’s the present.)

But what is monumental to me, is that on April 1, 1829,[iv] Rebecca Utterback purchased a deed for land in Ralls County, five months before her September 24, 1829, marriage to William Scott Ely. Monumental, first, because the land is deeded to a woman, likely a way for her father to protected her future. But monumental, second because of how the plot of land figures prominently in how Gillian’s father, Peter Philander Morris, meets his future wife!

I love land records! Next week’s post finally gets to the place all these Missouri Bound ramblings were heading—Ralls County and Chariton County, and how “the twain shall meet.”

Now, until next week, I dive back in…to editing my fictional past. Maybe a post on editing is coming soon???

[i] Raleigh Travers Green. Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper County, Virginia. Embracing a Revised and Enlarged Edition of Dr. Philip slaughter’s History of St. Mark’s Parish. Culpeper, Va, USA: Regional Publishing Co., 1900. Ancestry.com [accessed 11-19-13]
[ii] Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2012. Source Bibliography: Breitbard, Gail. Some Early Virginia Immigrants. In The Lost Palatine, no. 5 (1982), pp. 4-5. Ancestry. Com [accessed 5-14-17]
[iii] https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MO0120__.371&docClass=STA&sid=ec205vrk.qql#patentDetailsTabIndex=2 https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MO0260__.158&docClass=STA&sid=ec205vrk.qql
[iv] https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MO0260__.323&docClass=STA&sid=e0k0rsad.td4#patentDetailsTabIndex=2

Missouri Bound Part Four: The Tschudi/Judy Family

Posted on

 

United States 1819

The United States in about 1819, the same time Mary Judy and Isaac Ely moved from Kentucky to Missouri Territory.

In the last three posts, I discussed the lineage of Gillian Virginia Morris(s), my Great-great-grandmother on my grandmother’s side, including the migration of that lineage from Virginia and Kentucky to Missouri. Her parents, grandparents, and her great-grandparents on her mother’s side would call Missouri home.

 

As review:

In Part I. I provided extensive information on the Salling (Sally, Salley) family who settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia. I included evidence to support the correction of an error in the parentage of Malinda Salling, mother to Peter Philander Morris, Gillian’s father.

Part II. I detailed my attempt to determine the parentage of Thomas H. Morris(s), Gilllian’s grandfather, who also lived in Rockbridge County, Virginia. The results were inconclusive. His parentage remains a brick-wall.

Part III. I documented the Ely family who came to America in the 1700’s and settled along the Cacapehon River in what would be Hampshire County, West Virginia. I provided evidence of the movement of son of Isaac Ely, Sr., Benjamin Ely, and his family, to Clark County, Kentucky, as well as proof of the Clark County marriage of his son Isaac Ely and Mary Judy. They were Gillian’s great-grandparents.

Now, what about the Judy family?

The surname “Judy” is of Swiss origin and was originally spelled Tschudi (Tschudy). The spelling morphed into “Judy” and “Judah” soon after the family arrived in America. Four men with the Tschudi name came to Philadelphia between 1740 and 1770. They included: Mardin Tschudi in 1738; Martin Tschudi in 1749, settling in Hampshire County, WV; Weinbert Tschudi in 1752.[i]

Then, my ancestor, Martin Tschudi, in the company of a Martin Nicholas Tschudi and Johann Tschudi, sailed from Rotterdam on The Sally and, after a stop in Cowes, England, disembarked on November 10, 1767.[ii] It is possible all four Tschudi’s were related. They all came from the Canton of Basel in Switzerland and many given names were the same.[iii]

According to the Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies, he arrived with wife Anna Boni and children, Johannes, Martin, Elisabeth, and Anna.[iv] A son, Jacob Judy, was born September 18, 1767, this according to information in Find-a-Grave, which would indicate he was born on the ship. Afterward, Martin and Anna had three more known children: Winepark (Weinbert), David, and Samuel.[v] Some say there was one more daughter, a Nancy but the evidence is, so far, scant.

While numerous records for a Martin Tschudi exist, there is no clear evidence of where the family resided before 1791 in Bourbon County, Kentucky.[vi] The name was common and there were at least six of that name in America in those early years. Family lore abounds regarding the “Trek” to Kentucky, but I have found little definitive evidence to support it.

The 1800, Clark County, Kentucky tax list includes Martin Sr. and his sons David, John J, Martin Jr., Samuel, and Winepack (Weinbert).[vii] So between 1767 and 1800, the family, excluding John,[viii] had settled in Clark County, Kentucky. By then Martin Jr., Mary Judy’s father, had married Elizabeth Judy. While proven in a probate record,[ix] I’ve found no marriage record.

Family Lore says she was Martin’s first cousin, but I’ve found no proof. Of various suppositions I’ve found, the most likely candidate for Elizabeth’s father is Weinbert Tschudi who arrived in Pennsylvania fifteen years before Martin., or could be the Johann Tschudi who arrived with Martin. Some have linked her to a Johannes (John) and Maria Shaffner Judy from Fort Pitt in Pennsylvania, but Lancaster, PA, Mennonite Vital Records for a couple with the same names show them married in 1808, much too late to be Elizabeth’s parents. Some family historians indicate the father of Martin Sr. in Switzerland was the one who married a cousin. I mention all this speculation because it is floating out there as fact, so I wanted the reader to be aware of it. If anyone has validating information I would love to see it!

Regardless, Martin Jr. and Elizabeth Judy had a daughter, Mary (Polly) Judy. She married Isaac Ely, in 1798, and by 1820, they had moved to Missouri.

Like an extended Abbott and Costello skit, let’s play the game of Who’s On First, only our game is Who’s in Missouri.

  • Mary (Polly) Judy and Isaac Ely arrived in Ralls County, Missouri by 1824, more likely by 1819 when Isaac’s father Benjamin is recorded as arriving.[x]
  • Malinda Salling and Thomas H. Morris(s) are in Chariton County, Missouri, by 1849.[xi]

Now for one more piece of the Who’s in Missouri puzzle: Part Five of the Missouri posts—The Utterback Family.

 Map courtesy of Library of Congress; A new and elegent general atlas, containing maps of each of the United States; Baltimore : Fielding Lucas, [1817?]
[i] Strassburger; Pennsylvania German Pioneers, Vol 1, 1727-1775; Genealogical Publishing Company; Find My Past; pages 249, 391, 507
[ii] Ibid. pg. 738
[iii] Faust, A.B. & Brumbaugh, Gaiius. Lists of Swiss emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies, Vol. 2. Washington, D.C.: the National Genealogical Society, 1925. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing co., Baltimore, 1976.
[iv] Ibid. pg. 243
[v] Various Find-a-grave resources for cemeteries in Clark County, Kentucky
[vi] Ancestry.com. Kentucky, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1810-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Kentucky Census, 1810-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.
[vii] Ancestry.com. Kentucky, Tax Lists, 1799-1801, original from: Clift, G. Glenn. Second Census of Kentucky, 1800. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co.
[viii] No definitive record until 1820 census and Find-a-grave Greene County, Ohio
[ix] Heirs of Martin Judy; Ralls county Court House, pg. 537-538; probate 15 May 1838; transcribed by N.L. Moore.
[x] Documentation to come soon, in a separate post.
[xi] Documentation provided in Part II of the Missouri posts

Missouri bound Part 3: The Ely Family heads to Kentucky

Posted on
Kentucky 1793

This map is from 1793, about the time the Ely Family moved to Kentucky. Want a close up version? You can find it at The Library of Congress Maps Division.

There is safety as well as security in numbers, and before the advent of the railroad and adequate communication systems, most families moved in groups, an important consideration when researching. The Ely, Judy, and Utterback families were no exception. As I continued cleaning up my information (in anticipation of a hiatus from fact finding to focus on fiction) the probing of proximity became my go-to tool.

First, a reminder, my current cleanup centers on the family of my great-great grandmother Gillian Virginia Morris who married Gabriel Ison. They are the parents of my grandmother Mary Elizabeth Ison. The two previous posts (Parts 1 and 2) outlined new and reviewed information on the Morris and Salling (Sally) family who ended up in Chariton and Ralls County, Missouri. Gillian’s parents were Peter Philander Morris and Elizabeth Ely. So what do we know about this Ely family?

Isaac Ely arrived in Hampshire County, (West) Virginia by 1767. He purchased a land grant from Lord Fairfax on either side of the Cacaphon (Cacapon) River at this time, this according to many genealogies providing very accurate detail. Lord Fairfax was “Baron of Cameron in that part of Great Britain called Scotland” so most of his grants were given to those loyal to him, usually of Scottish descent. I have yet to find the document for this land grant. Still, Isaac’s will, which I will discuss later, verifies the information.

On or about 1777, Benjamin Ely, Isaac Ely’s only son, married Mary Scott whose father was also a landholder in Hampshire County. William Scott’s will, dated November 22, 1767, divided his estate equally between Mary and his wife Sarey (Sarah).[i] Isaac Ely witnessed the will. On February 9, 1779, Sarey and Mary transferred the rights to 96 acres on both sides of Little Cacapehon, which had been surveyed on May 22, 1755, for Mary’s father William Scott.[ii] Benjamin had also purchased 30 acres on both sides of Little Cacapehon Creek on July 29, 1778,[iii] and 426 acres on the waters of the Old Road Run and Buffaloe Gap Run on December 6, 1778.[iv]

Three important asides regarding research in general:

  1. I discovered Benjamin’s grants at the Library of Virginia website while looking for the 1767 purchase under the NECK… Never underestimate the value of the University of Virginia site for VA research. It is invaluable.
  2. The Ohio Genealogical Society offered a one-year FREE subscription to Find My Past to all members. The more sites to search the better. Have I told you lately how much I love OGS?
  3. The New Newberry Library Atlas of Historical County Boundaries is back on-line. This fabulous interactive resource helped me determine the following Bourbon County/Clark County link.

By 1791, based on the Kentucky Early Census Index, Benjamin Ely move his family to Bourbon County, Kentucky. It is no wonder that his father gave 1/3 of his Hampshire County Estate to his wife Sarah, a sum of 10 pounds to his only son Benjamin, and the rest of his estate to William, IF he stayed on the Hampshire land grant. It was William alone who registered his grandfather Isaac Ely’s will in the county court on February 15, 1796, soon after his death.[v]

The 1800 Kentucky Tax List includes Benjamin Ely on the Clark County rolls as well as Isaac Ely. This Isaac was Benjamin’s oldest son next to William. Isaac was also his grandfather’s namesake and my 3x great grandfather. He had just married a Mary Polly Judy in 1798.

Finding the October 13, 1798, marriage record for Isaac Ely and Mary Judy[vi] was a major accomplishment—well, actually it was pure serendipity. While painstakingly sifting through the Clark County, Kentucky records for 1798 one-by-one, I discovered it, with oddly spelled surnames.Mary Juda and Isaac Raly marriage 1798 copy

On another note of serendipity, my own nearly marriage of nearly 47 years began on October 13th just like Isaac and Mary Polly Judy Ely.

The Ely family and the Judy family lived just miles apart, both in Clark County. As I’ve said many times, place matters.

Next week: the Judy family and the Ely family’s move to Missouri.

Meanwhile, I’ve completed my update to the Morris(s), Ely, Judy, and Utterback family sheets. You can find them here and on the new Convergence on Missouri tab at the top of the page.

[i] William Scott will, 22 November 1767 image 1037-8 Wills; Author: Hampshire County (West Virginia). Clerk of the County Court; Probate Place: Hampshire, West Virginia Ancestry.com. West Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1724-1985 [2017]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
[ii] http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=94&last=&g_p=GR&collection=NN Grant
[iii] http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=315&last=&g_p=GQ&collection=NN Grant
[iv] http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=70&last=&g_p=GR&collection=NN Grant
[v] Isaac Ely will, posted 15 February 1796 image 1037-8 Wills; Author: Hampshire County (West Virginia). Clerk of the County Court; Probate Place: Hampshire, West Virginia Ancestry.com. West Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1724-1985 [2017]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
[vi] Isaac Raly and Mary Juda Marriage 13 October 1798 image 90; Kentucky County Marriages, 1797-1954 FamilySearch database with images; Madison County Courthouse, Richmond.

Missouri Bound Part 2: Thomas Morris of Rockbridge County, Virginia

Posted on

morris-marriageOver the last two weeks, I watched the mailbox, expecting for an envelope from Rockbridge Circuit Court containing the marriage bond records of Thomas H. Morris and Malinda Salling Morris. I knew they held the name of Malinda’s father, Peter Salling (see previous posting), but I hoped it would provide me with the identity of Thomas H. Morris’s parents. The Virginia marriage bonds often are a family affair. The envelope came. No luck.

Next step, analyze all the information I have collected to see what it revealed. I had two goals: determine the parentage and pinpoint the date Thomas H. and Malinda moved to Missouri. Here is what I did.

  1. Organize all marriage information into a table.
  2. Organize census information by year for Rockbridge County, VA, Ralls and Chariton (Howard) County, MO 1810-1840
  3. Compare it with miscellaneous information gathered from written histories and Chancery documents.

What did I discover?

  1. As yet, the parentage of Thomas H. Morris is unknown, but I suspect it is John Morris, likely son of Thomas Morris and Elizabeth. My rational: 3 1810 records show a male of Thomas’s age (about 12). Two of those men were children of Mark Morris: William and David. (Note: there are other scenarios, based on naming patterns. I do not know who Mark’s parents were, though likely Thomas and Elizabeth.
  2. They moved to Missouri between 1841 and October 1849.Thomas H. appears on the 1850 census for Howard County, Missouri. A careful reading of the 1841 Chancery records for Malinda’s father Peter shows he was present at the proceedings while Malinda’s brother, John Adam was not there. Lucinda Morris, daughter of Thomas H. and Malinda, married Congrave Warden in Howard County, 1849.

In 1778, when Rockbridge County formed, two families of note owned tithable land in the county, both near the Rock Bridge formation that gave the county its name. George Salling (Salley, Sally) owned two plots and Thomas Morris owned one. These pioneers and their wives populated the county with many children. I focused on George in the last post. Now let’s look at Thomas.

Thomas Morris, from an analysis of marriage bonds and Chancery records, had eleven children: Benjamin, John, Joseph, George, Margaret (Peggy), Agatha, Nancy Elizabeth, Mary, Sarah, and Elijah. Mark may also be one of their children. Oddly, I found no Thomas of the appropriate age. It is from this family, somehow, that Thomas H. sprung.

A glutton for detail? Find my analysis here.morris-analysis

Missouri Bound: Out of Rockbridge County, Virginia Part I

salling-estate-newspaper-article

I was Just Plain Wrong

In my New Year’s quest to review all my family records for accuracy, I turned to my grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Ison’s ancestry. Her parents Gabriel Ison and Gillian (Gillie) Virginia Morris(s) married in Missouri.[i] Gillie was the daughter of Peter Philander Morris and Elizabeth Ely.[ii] I’ll delve into the Ison, Morris, and Ely family history and how they came to Missouri in later posts. This is just Part I of my efforts to rectifying any abuses of the following rules of genealogical research:

  1. Never rely on another researcher’s family tree without looking for documentation.
  2. Always back-up your work with documentation or a triangulated proof.
  3. Use “Find-a-grave” for information on photographed and marked graves only. Otherwise refer to #1.

Gillie’s father Peter Philander Morris was the son of Thomas H. Morris and Malinda Salling.[iii] In previous posts I stated Malinda’s father to be George Salling, right family wrong sibling. This post repairs that error and provides just a smattering of amazing information I’ve discovered as I researched her ancestry.

Malinda Salling was born to Peter Salling and Rebecca Holms[iv] on March 19, 1803 (ca).[v] How do I know this? Because I just finished analyzing 1,126 pages of Chancery documents available at the Library of Virginia website.

An aside: I find Chancery documents in which inheritance issues, often complex, are ironed out, often over extended periods of time to be the genealogical mother lode. If you have any Virginia ancestors, check out this site. http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/?_ga=1.224291475.920046502.1485978183

Let’s Start at the Beginning with the Patriarch: John Peter Salling

John Peter Salling arrived in Pennsylvania in 1733 with wife Anna Maria Vollmar and children Elizabeth and Anna Catharina. [vi] On 14 November 1735, he filed a warrant for 250 acres of land on Conestoga Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.[vii]

Then: “In the year 1740, I came from Pennsylvania to the part of Orange County now called Augusta; and settled in a fork of the James River close under the Blue Ridge Mountains of the West side, where I now live.”[viii]

This passage comes from John Peter’s recollections of his capture by Indians, his transfer into the hands of the French, and his eventual recovery by the British Navy and his return to “Charles Town.” (For more on his crazy adventure go to the link cited in endnotes.) An Index of his will names one son besides the daughters who came from Northern Alsace (Germany) with him, that son is George Adam Salling.[ix]

The Family of George Adam Salling

From the Chancery Document of Augusta County, Virginia, we know that George Adam Salling of Orange County, North Carolina bought and transferred a warrant for 200+ acres to George Salling on the first bend of the James River.[x] Biographical information in A History of Rockbridge County says George Adam moved to North Carolina about 1760. He must have returned to Rockbridge or was simply cleaning up old warrants, as his will is recorded in August County (the land in what would be Rockbridge County, VA). It provides for the same 200+ acres for George and is “proved” 1 June 1789, about a year after George Adam Sallings death.

The Chancery records include an incomplete copy of the will of George Adam Salling, 1788. It lists his male offspring: Henry, Peter, and George. He leaves use of the meadow and the house to his wife Hannah along with the use of Henry’s portion of the plantation until he reaches maturity. He declares that the plantation at the fork of the James and North Rivers with three hundred sixty odd acres and meadow be divided equally between sons Henry and Peter (the quality of the division the reason for the dispute). He gives two hundred twenty acres to son George. With wife Hannah to “support that part of my unmarried children who may chuse to continue with her and likewise to give them the necessary schooling.”[xi]

The above statement indicates additional children. Virginia marriage bonds are family affairs, often listing the parentage of both bride and groom. I was able to add Magdalen, Elizabeth, Peggy, and Hannah.[xii] George Salling who married Matilda 19 January 1791 and moved to Gate City, Scott county, Virginia between 1810 and 1820. (This is the George I incorrectly designated as Malinda’s father.)

Thanks to the extraordinary effort of Marilyn Headley and Angela Ruley. They digitalized the Rockbridge County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1801. A great resource, http://www.usgwarchives.net/va/rockbridge/license.html

The Children of Henry and Peter Salling

For this portion, let me introduce you to Peter A. Salling, the son of Peter Salling, and he had a mission: to acquire the whole of the estate of George Salling. He and his wife, Aurelia Paxton had no children aside from Aurelia’s neice whom they adopted. It seems tradition was important to Peter A., so he left his substantial estate to his namesake nephew, Peter A. Salling.

rockbridge-county-detailThe “Mrs Salling” at the Fork of the James and North River is Aurelia, the last owner of the Salling Plantation.

The ins and outs of his complicated acquisitions and the dispersals at his and Aurelia’s death led to four separate Chancery filings over fifty years. From these records we know:

  • Henry Salling (of George) married Lucy and had children: Lucy, Mary Polly, Hannah, Magdalene, George Jackson, Lavinia, Henry, and Benjamin. Henry died in 1834.[xiii]
  • Peter Salling (of George) married Rebecca Holms and had children: John, Rebecca wife of William Harrison, Malinda wife of Thomas H Morris (Happy Dance!), and Mary Ann deceased who had children by a Goodwin (George W., Harriet wife of William Wasky, Peter A (the namesake), Robert B, John, and Rebecca wife of David Ely who died after her Grandfather Peter who died in 1839[xiv]

As you can imagine, the 1, 126 pages of information holds gems galore. One page of interest lists the names of Negros to be distributed to the heirs as exchange for their share of plantation land. Thomas H. Morris, Malinda’s husband, took his share in slaves.[xv] slave-dist-morrisInsights into farming, husbandry, life in Texas, and changes brought by the Civil War comes to life in these pages. I can only say—again—if you have any ancestors in Virginia and know the county of origin, check out the Library of Virginia.

Next week: Thomas H. Morris and who moved to Missouri…

[i] Marriage License of Gabriel Ison and Gillian Morris Ancestry.com. Missouri, Marriage Records, 1805-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007. Original data: Missouri Marriage Records. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm.
[ii] Census record of Peter P. Morris Year: 1870; Census Place: Township 55 Range 19, Chariton, Missouri; Roll: M593_768; Page: 362B; Image: 63785; Family History Library Film: 552267 Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[iii] Peter Philander Morris Death Certificate #9537 (T.H. Morris and Malinda Salling parents)
[iv] Peter Salling/Rebecca Holms marriage bond 9 April 1787, Rockbridge County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1801, digitalized at http://www.usgwarchives.net/va/rockbridge/license.html
[v] Malinda H. Morris Find A Grave Memorial# 37019534, Brunswick City Cemetery, Brunswick Township, Chariton County, Missouri.
[vi] Burgert, Annette K. Eighteenth Century emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America. Camden, ME: Picton Press, 1992. Pg. 416; Ancestry. Com. U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index.
[vii] Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data: Warrant Applications, 1733-1952. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania State Archives.
[viii] The Journal of John Peter Salling, transcribed by L.S. Workman from The Annals of an American Family by E. Wadell http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/augusta/misc/m-sal01.txt
[ix] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Land, Marriage, and Probate Records, 1639-1850. Orignial data: Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1965. Originally published in 1912. NOTE: I did not find this record in the Library of Virginia Chancery Records.
[x] Index # 1818-104, Augusta Co. Henry Salling vs. Peter Salling. Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Chancery Record Index, pg. 68.
[xi] Ibid. pg 27.
[xii] Rockbridge County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1801. All found under “M”
[xiii] Index # 1840-028, Rockbridge Co. Peter A. Salling vs. heirs of Henry Salling. Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Chancery Record Index, pg. 3.
[xiv] Index # 1841-019, Rockbridge Co. John Salling vs. heirs of Peter Salling. Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Chancery Record Index.
[xv] Ibid pg 27

Cleaning Up The New England Paynes, Grimes, Carnes, and Williams Families

smedley-house

Nehemiah Smedley House, Williamstown, MA “…whence on one occasion they adjourned to the house of Nehemiah Smedley…were..John Smedley, Ephraim Selye, Samuel Payn” The place of founder’s meetings from 1763 (then West Hoosac) when voting on the necessities of bridges, the outline of lots, and, of course, money to “Sport the Gospel”. (From Origins of Williamstown Pg 464)

This week I’ve focused on the cleanup and reorganization of the family sheets for the ancestors who lived in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont. This includes family names Payne, Little, Grimes, Carnes, and Williams. The New England reward for family historians is the wealth of church and town records; the draw back is the dearth of tax and land records. Most of what appears in these sheets is based on church and town records. Find them here. new-haven-family-sheets-2017 And if the Payne family descendants interest you, check out more posts by hitting the link to the Payne family found to the left of the post on my website.

As always, the impact of place intrigues me, so I put together a brief outline of the migratory pattern (or lack thereof) of these families. I found it particularly interesting because some of these people are the fictitious characters for my just finished book and the one percolating in my mind.

  • 1635-1785 New Haven Colony/Connecticut was home to the William Payne, Richard Little/Joan Walker, Thomas Carnes, John Payne/Mary Little, and William Payne/Ester Carnes families
  • 1645-1712 Hartford, Wethersfield, Connecticut was home to the Henry Grimes, Josheph Grimes, Abraham William/Eunice Boardman Families
  • Before 1739 Goshen, Connecticut became the first major migration destination when Christoper Grimes/Abigail Williams move northwest from Wethersfield, CT
  • The two families centered in New Haven and Wethersfield joined when Samuel Payne of New Haven and Abigail Grimes born in Wethersfield, now living in Goshen married. They moved often:
    • 1758 “the nine partners” in Dutchess County, New York just west of Goshen, CT
    • 1761 back to New Haven for the birth of a child while Samuel negotiated a purchase in
    • June, 1761 in Williamstown, Massachusetts
    • Between 1773 and 1778 moved to Bennington County, Vermont (then disputed country)
    • 1790-1800 lived in Panton, Addison County, Vermont
    • After 1810 likely moved to Ohio with sons Zerah and Amasa

I always considered the moves of Christoper Grimes’s family to Goshen, CT. I was wrong. Christoper brought his family to Goshen at its formation by 1739 and according to the History of the Town of Goshen, 1897 by Rev. Hubbard, “…there was no road open either north or west in in 1745; but all was forest…” (Pg 57)

Samuel Payne’s moves to Williamstown and Bennington County were equally adventuresome. The map below shows the country at the time of Lt. General Burgoyne’s campaign in the country during his Revolutionary War campaign of 1777, the time of the Battle of Bennington.(From the Library of Congress by William Faden pub. 1780. It would not allow me to crop but look closely and find Williamstown and Bennington near the bottom left of the map.)vt_1780_military_burgoyne_web

Cleaning Up Wills Creek

IMG_0394

View near Wills Creek

As my New Year’s Resolution promised, I am working to Be open to what I don’t know, accept when I don’t know it, and make sure I admit it, because what I don’t know opens me to discovery and growth.” I’ve gone through my Wills Creek, Pennsylvania ancestry and updated my tree and family sheets for that section only. It includes family of patriarchs and matriarchs Alexander Huston, Mary and Sarah Huston. Jacob Croy, Jacob Oswalt Sr and Jr, and Susanna Oswalt and Andrew Croy. You can find them here.western-pa-family-sheet-2017

I’ve been pointed in my level of confidence, I hope. If I have no documentation for a relationship, I indicate “Unknown.”If I calculated dates based on tax records, I say so. Any dates derived from census information either are noted as “about” with a ~ or “between” using <>. After applying for the First Ohio Families and Civil War Families, and having some very astute individuals asking for documentation that I couldn’t produce, I am VERY cautious. Of course there is always doubt…ie “My best conclusion with evidence at hand.” History is always a little uncertain. This is my best attempt.

Some new information surfaced and old information came into focus during the process. I found the gravesite of Rebecca Johnson, Clark County, Ohio daughter of Jacob and Mary Huston. file:///Users/user/Desktop/Rebecca%20Johnston%20(1773%20-%201841)%20-%20Find%20A%20Grave%20Memorial.webarchive Also found the newspaper article in the Glenville Democrat path finder about Peter Waggoner and Sarah Oswalt of Jacob Oswalt, Jr.  A great resource for that family, found in Ancestry.com. I also reworked all my information on the HUSTON family in Wills Creek. You can access that spreadsheet here.the-huston-family-in-western-pennsylvania

As I redo family sheets, I am eliminating my old family book narrative as it holds errors, and I plan to redo it—someday. Meanwhile my goal is to go through every set of family sheets and reorganize the pages to make room for a page devoted to my historical fiction where facts are a springboard into imaginary worlds.