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Category Archives: Croy Family History

Why Apply to Lineage Societies? Five Good Reasons

Richard Croy marriage 1839

An outcome of applying to lineage societies was discovering what happened to Richard Croy and Rachel Crist after their marriage.

I completed my applications to two lineage societies of the Ohio Genealogy Society yesterday (well, almost). The Societies are the First Families of Ohio and the Families of the Old Northwest Territory. Last year I waded into this world by applying and being accepted into The Society of Civil War Families of Ohio. The process is rigorous, requires extensive documentation, costs money, and carries with it only the honor of membership, along with a pin and certificate. Now, I am neither a big joiner nor spendthrift. Nor do I collect pins, plaques, or certificates. So why bother? Let me count the ways.

  1. I am documenting, with certification of my work, an accurate history of family.
  2. The record is stored securely where it is available to all researchers to use for their specific current and future purposes.[i]
  3. The process hones my skills and the depth and accuracy of my propositions.
  4. I feel accomplished upon completion—a job well done (I hope).

And—bells chime and trumpet sounds…

  1. New discoveries present themselves. Doors, never seen before, open to sources yet untapped!

Here is an example from my recent venture.

I had never traced Richard Croy, son of Andrew Croy, beyond his appearance on an 1840 Federal Census for Rose Twp, Carroll Cty, OH[ii] with wife Rachel Crist[iii] and a male under 5. Then, while doing other research, I saw a family page with an interesting tree for Richard.

I delved into it and discovered a little treasure trove in Delaware County, Ohio. It seems Richard and family moved there after 1840, or Rachel traveled there after his death before 25 March 1847 when she remarried David Hodgden.[iv]

Why she only kept her daughter, Emily Jane Croy, then age 6,[v] and farmed out son John, then age 11,[vi] to the Hinkle family, and Mathias, then age 8,[vii] to the Bush family, both in Troy Township, Delaware County, we can never know. Perhaps Rachel had limited resources after Richard died, and the boys boarded as laborers for the families.

At any rate, their lives were hard and ended in the Civil War. Mathias, who served with Company F of the 96th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, died of chronic diarrhea in Louisiana on 12 June 1863.[viii] John died of scarlet fever on 9 August 1864 at Andersonville Prison. Emily Jane, who married a Wesley Overturf, lived on, and moved from Illinois, to Missouri, to Indian Territory (Oklahoma.)[ix]

Still a mystery: the exact time, place, and cause of Richard’s death. Some mysteries are never solved; but maybe when I least expect it.

[i] The Ohio Genealogical Society keeps these records on file and provides a searchable list of their names. The information is available upon request. You can even join a society by using the member # and provide documentation connecting you to any verified ancestor, thus entering your family’s documentation into the database.
[ii] Richard Croy; 1840; Census Place: Rose, Carroll, Ohio; Roll: 381; Page: 248; Image: 504; Family History Library Film: 0020160 Ancestry.com. 1840 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
[iii] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-17957-92159-97?cc=1614804 : 15 July 2014), Carroll > Marriage records 1833-1849 vol 1 > image 95 of 203; county courthouses, Ohio.
[iv] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-17962-52947-52?cc=1614804 : 15 July 2014), Delaware > Marriage records 1846-1858 vol 2 > image 33 of 316; county courthouses, Ohio.
[v] Emily Jane Croy and Rachel; 1850; Census Place: Brown, Delaware, Ohio; Roll: M432_675; Page: 300A; Image: 412 Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[vi] John Croy; 1850; Census Place: Troy, Delaware, Ohio; Roll: M432_675; Page: 287; Image: 384 Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[vii] Mathias Croy; 1850; Census Place: Troy, Delaware, Ohio; Roll: M432_675; Page: 286A; Image: 384 Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
[viii] Mathias Croy; U.S., Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, compiled 1861–1865. ARC ID: 656639. Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s–1917. Record Group 94. National Archives at Washington, D.C.
[ix] based on 1870, 80, and 1900 Federal Census information

The Jolley, Russel, and Croy Families in Union County

It’s cleanup time for the family of Jacob and Mary Huston Croy.

Watkins Margaret Jolly

Picture by author: Mitchell Cemetery, Union County, Ohio, May 2016

First, the last of my cemetery visits while in Ohio. I enjoyed the trip and discovered so much. On my first morning there, I bravely set out to find three cemeteries. I was a novice at this but managed the first two, Union and Watkins, well enough, but by the time I found the last of them, Mitchell Cemetery, I was tired and feeling rushed, not a good combination for detective work. I sometimes wish I lived closer!

Mary (Croy) Roberts moved to Union County with George Roberts after their marriage in 1807.[i] George died some time between 1815 and 1819. [ii]Mary lived near her daughters Elizabeth Croy Russel (husband James Russel) and Eleanor Croy Marquis (husband John Marquis) in 1820 Darby Township. With Mary were two children; based on their ages they are likely Margaret Croy born 31 January 1805 and David H. Croy born 1 June 1801. [iii]

Margaret, the youngest of Mary Huston Croy (Roberts) and Jacob Croy’s children is buried in Mitchell cemetery, one of the oldest in Union County. A number of her descendants and her husband’s previous wife are buried there as well. I was able to find those gravesites, slowly dissolving under a lichen cover. Margaret married John Jolley (his second marriage) early in 1827-1830.[iv] (A fun fact: John Jolley indicated in his will that no more than $20 should be spent on his granite headstone.[v])

Watkins John Jolley

Picture by author: Mitchell Cemetery, Union County, OH, May 2016

At Watkins Cemetery, also dissolving under lichen, I found David H Croy and Sarah (Sally) Wasson Croy. They had married in Franklin County, OH on 14 December 1828.[vi]

9 David H Croy

Picture by author: Watkins Cemetery, Union Cty, OH

In the process of reviewing this information, I discovered more.

First regarding Elizabeth, whose life was a mystery to me after her husband died on 28 August 1828. [vii] I now know she married Christian Sager on 8 November 1835[viii] but divorced him before 1847 when Christian remarried. Knowing her new surname, I found the 1850 Federal Census Mortality Schedule showing she died March 1850 of an inflammation of the lungs, being ill seven days.[ix]

Next, I saw reference to a Union County History so went searching. It unveiled some information about the men these Croy women married. I’ve quoted the information here.[x]

“James Russel, from Loudoun County, Va., was a comparatively early settler on the J.S. Smith place near the southern line of the township. He continued his residence here to the time of his death. Amasa Payne owned and occupied the E.D. Smith place in the southeastern part of the township.” (An aside: Amasa Payne is the brother of Sephronia Payne, my great-great grandmother, however, I have discovered no other connections between these families.)

“John Jolly was a North Carolinian. His family was of the Quaker persuasion and he, imbued with the principles of that sect, left his native State from an abhorrence of the institution of slavery and sought a home in Ohio. In 1818, with his wife, Hannah (Cook), and three children, he settled upon a tract of wild land he had purchased in the southern part of Survey 7,218, now the home of Charles Nicol. Here he cleared the land and tilled the soil, engaging also, to some extent, in shoe-making. He was an earnest supporter of the Methodist Church. His children by his first marriage were Elias, who removed to Kansas; Michel, who married Fredrick Sager; Rachel; Joel; Mary, who married Adam Brown; John; Jeremiah, of Kansas; and Lewis, of Iowa. His second wife was Margaret Croy, who still lives with her daughter Eleanor, wife of A.J. Ferguson. By this marriage there were six children—Betsy, who married David and is now deceased; Eli, Eleanor, Margaret and two who died young. Mr. Jolly died July 31, 1860, at Unionville, aged seventy-eight years.” (Note: This and cemetery information gives Hannah as Lewis’ mother, however according to cemetery records, Hannah died in January of 1827 and Lewis was born in December of 1827, either indicating an error in dates or making Margaret his mother and 1827 the likely marriage date unless there is an error on the cemetery records.[xi])

On another note, I will limit my posts in complexity and quantity for a while because of a number of projects.

  1. I am attempting to document the family for the Ohio Genealogical Society beyond the Civil War brothers through their original entry into Ohio before 1830, including Alexander Huston’s entry while Ohio was still part of the Northwestern Territory.
  2. I hope to write my first genealogy article for a journal.
  3. I am working with my editor to take my first book from manuscript to print sometime next year.

Oh, one other thing: To all my readers, for your interest, information, and encouragement, THANK YOU!

[i] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-18084-9656-32?cc=1614804 : accessed 22 June 2015), Columbiana > Marriage records 1803-1818 vol 1 > image 15 of 166; county courthouses, Ohio.
[ii] John Huston vs. Henry McGrath, Chancery Records; Records Center and Archives, Montgomery County Reibold Building 117 South Main Street, 6th floor, P.O. Box 972, Dayton, Ohio 45422-1110
1820 U.S. Census; Darby Township, Union, Ohio; Page: 208; NARA Roll: M33_94; Image:256. Ancestry.com. [database on-line accessed 16 April 2014]
[iii] Ibid
[iv] Lewis Jolley, Oakdale Cemetery, Adel, Dallas County, Iowa; Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com
Hannah Jolley, Mitchell Cemetery, Union County, Ohio.
[v] Will Records, 1852-1908; Probate Place: Union, Ohio Ancestry.com. Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Ohio County, District and Probate Courts.[accessed 12 August]
[vi] Ancestry.com. Ohio Marriages, 1789-1898 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Smith, Marjorie, ed. Ohio Marriages. Extracted from The Old Northwest Genealogical Quarterly. 1977. Reprint, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1986.
[vii] Bigelow Pioneer Cemetery, Madison County, OH; Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com
[viii] Copy of Marriage Certificate George Sager biographical sketch. Published by the Union County History Book Committee in “Family Heritage-Union County, Ohio; Ancestry.com 1985. From entry of 01 Jan 2011 Ancestry.com [accessed 16 Aug 2016]
[ix] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Non-population Census Schedules for Ohio, 1850-1880; Archive Collection: T1159; Archive Roll Number: 15; Census Year: 1850; Census Place: Subdivision 146, Union, Ohio Ancestry.com. U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885 [database on-line accessed 16 August 2016]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
[x] Durant, Pliny, The History of Union County Ohio (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co. 1883) Library of Congress: Open Library pg 227
[xi] see iv

From the “Rolls” of Washington County: The last two “Croy Boys”

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civil war induction by Hank Cradduck at tt

credit: Hank Craddock

The photo taken at the OGS Society of Civil War Families of Ohio induction ceremony arrived a couple months back. At the time, I was elbow deep in the buckets of information from my trip to Ohio, so just filed it away.

I met Deb Root Shell at this meeting, a serendipitous gift. She pointed me in the direction of the Washington County, Ohio Civil War Rolls tucked away in a manila folder at the Washington County Library Local History and Genealogy Archives. She is in the process of transcribing all of the records into a book. I have already posted transcriptions of five of the seven Croy brothers who served in the Civil War. Today I finish my Washington County posts with the rolls of the last two brothers.

William P. Croy, late of Coshocton County, first bought land in Washington County on 7 February 1853 from Alexander and Sarah Johnson.[i] There were two parcels, one 40 acre parcel, the west portion of section 32, T 6 R 11 and another 5 acres near Cutler, Ohio. His father, mother, and family joined him there before late 1860. He had married Rebecca Jane Huston in Coshocton County on 14 June 1855.[ii] A child, Anderson, was born 12 July 1856.[iii] He was their only child. The information from the “Rolls” is recorded below.

“William Croy, son of Jacob & Margaret Croy, was born in Carrol Co. Oct. 4th 1836. Went from Fairfield Aug. 9th 1862 in Co “G” 92nd O.V.I. Never sick in Hosp, nor wounded, nor captured. Was detached as wagon master during most of the time after May 10th 1864, & was therefore not with the Regt in its subsequent engagements, and did not see it again till he was mustered out with it near Washington D.C. June 10th 1865 Married, & his one child. m. REBECCA J (?) son Anderson (or Andrew) b. ca 1865”[iv]

The last “Croy boy,” (our family still calls them that) was my great-grandfather, Calvin Harrison Croy. I have written extensively in many posts regarding him and included a few pictures, as well. He didn’t marry until after the Civil War, spending time living with his brother Nathan helping with the farm.[v] He then went to Coshocton to work in his Uncle David’s sawmill where he met Sarah Angeline Smith (more on her and her family in my postings as well).[vi] They married in Coshocton on 12 December 1872.[vii] (An interesting aside: I found a scribbled out intent to marry between Calvin and a Rebecca Huston date 6 June 1866…Don’t you wonder?) Here is what was entered in the Rolls right after the war.

“Calvin Croy, son of Jacob & Margaret Croy, was born in Coshoton Co May 13th 1848. Went from Fairfield, (1st) in Co. “F” 148th O.V.I. Was off duty but a day or two through sickness: Come home & was discharged with the Co. at Marietta. Enlisted (2nd) Feb 17th ’65 in Co. “G” 92nd O.V.I., & was transferred at the discharge of that Regt to Co “B” 31st O.V.I. Was never sick during service, excepting seasickness on the passage from N. York to Beauford N.C. Discharged July 20th 1865, Louisville, Ky.”[viii]

Next week I move back in time to what I discovered about the daughters of Alexander and Susannah Croy, the aunts of the Civil War “Croy Boys.” See you then.

[i] Grantee, William Croy; Grantor Alexander/Sarah Johnson; Washington County Court House, Deed book V 46 Pg 332.
[ii] William Croy/Rebecca Huston Marriage Certificate, 14 July 1855; Court of Common Pleas, Coshocton County, Ohio; Certified Copy privately held by Donna Croy Wright, Tollhouse, California, July 2015.
[iii] Soldier’s Certificate No. 695593, William P. Croy, Corporal, Company G, 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Case Files of Approved Pension applications of Veterans Who Served in the Army and Navy Mainly in the Civil War and the War with Spain (Civil War and Later Survivors’ Certificates), 1861-1934; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, p 20 National Archives, Washington, DC
[iv] Handwritten Roll of Honor document, compiled by Charles Strong Perry, 1865, Washington County Public Library, History and Genealogical Archive, 418 Washington St., Marietta, OH. Pg 8.
[v] Year: 1870; Census Place: Fairfield, Washington, Ohio; Roll: M593_1278; Page: 116A; Image: 136035; Family History Library Film: 552777 [accessed thru Ancestry.com 27 September 2012]
[vi] Year: 1880; Census Place: Keene, Coshocton, Ohio; Roll: 1003; Family History Film: 1255003; Page: 115C; Enumeration District: 048; Image: 0234 [accessed thru Ancestry.com 27 September 2012]
[vii] Calvin Croy/Sarah A Smith Certified Copy of Marriage Record, 12 December 1872; privately held by DeBernardi family. Photo held by Donna Croy Wright, Tollhouse, California.
[viii] Handwritten Roll of Honor document, compiled by Charles Strong Perry, 1865, Washington County Public Library, History and Genealogical Archive, 418 Washington St., Marietta, OH. Pg 9.

Throwback Thursday: Emily Gassage Croy, wife of Robert Croy

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Emily Croy 2Most lives aren’t fairy tales; some less than others. Emily Gassage Croy was born in Jefferson County either in 1835 (death record)[i] or January 1838 (gravestone)[ii]. She married Robert Croy in Coshocton County, Ohio on the same day as her brother Samuel married Mary Croy, Robert’s sister, 27 March 1854. [iii]

Robert bought property in Coshocton County in 1853[iv] but by 1860[v] they moved to where his brother William lived near Cutler, Ohio in Washington County. Robert, a carpenter by trade, joined Union Army in 1862. Here is the information from the “Rolls” interview soon after the war.[vi]

“Robert Croy, son of Jacob & Margaret Croy was born in Carrol [sic] Co O March 25th 1832. Sent from Fairfield in Co “G” 92nd O.V.I. Aug. 5th 1862 Was never sick to be in Hosp. or wounded or prisoner–Took part in all the regimental actions. Was discharged with his Co near Washington D.C. June 10th 1865. Married & has four children. Stanton b. ca. 1856, Joanna b. ca 1858, Rhoda b. ca 1860 and ?”

More on his war history here.

Tragedy struck soon after the war. Robert, Emily’s husband, came home with severe hearing loss. Coping with his frustrations, while caring for four children, Stanton, Joanna, Rhoda, and Lorrain (born just before he left for duty), Emily took ill in 1870 as did her youngest daughter. Lorrain died 19 February 1870 at 7 years 7 months. Emily died 14 April 1870.[vii]

Robert’s life maintained its tragic trajectory. Robert married Mary Aikens Nelson on 23 March 1871[viii] less than a year after his wife’s death. They had a son, Arthur. It was a troubled, contentious marriage. Out of his deafness and obstinacy (as his wife reported), or because of her daughter’s loose behavior and dislike of him (as he reported), no one can know.[ix] But we do know his son Stanton drowned, likely in the Ohio River, in Belfre, Ohio on 16 July 1874. The boy was 18 years 5 months 12 days old.[x] Facing the death of three loved ones within four years (not including his father and brother), as well as living in a world of limited communication, might sour a man. He lived, moving through the years from his daughter’s home to his sister’s home, until he died 23 March 1908.[xi]

robert obit

[i] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 22 July 2015), Washington County, Death Records, 1867-1908, image 62 of 492; county courthouse, Ohio. [calculated]
[ii] Emily Croy, Decatur Presbyterian Cemetery, Veto Road, Washington County, Ohio [calculated]
[iii] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-22512-85444-76?cc=1614804 : accessed 24 June 2015), Coshocton > Marriage licenses 1837-1854 > image 17 of 71; county courthouses, Ohio.
[iv] Coshocton County Court House, 4 Oct 1853, Grantee: Jacob & Robert Croy; Grantor Andrew G. Woods Vol 30, pg 298
[v] 1860 US Census; Census Place: Rose, Washington County, Ohio;
[vi] Handwritten Roll of Honor document, compiled by Charles Strong Perry, 1865, Washington County Public Library, History and Genealogical Archive, 418 Washington St., Marietta, OH. Fairfield Township, pg 7.
[vii] See “i” above
[viii] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-22512-85444-76?cc=1614804 : accessed 24 June 2015), Coshocton > Marriage licenses 1837-1854 > image 17 of 71; county courthouses, Ohio.
[ix] Soldier’s Certificate No. 679496, Robert Croy, Corporal, Company G, 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Case Files of Approved Pension applications of Veternans Who Served in the Army and Navy Mainly in the Civil War and the War with Spain (Civil War and Later Survivors’ Certificates), 1861-1934; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, National Archives, Washington, DC
[x] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” Washington County, Death Records, 1867-1908, pg 104 #2266
[xi] Robert Croy Obituary; March 23, 1908 , Marietta Daily Times ,page 1, column 5; Washington Co. Public Library, Local History and Genealogy Dept, 418 Washington St., Marietta, OH.

 

Early 19th Century Croy Occupations: Mill Workers and Carpenters

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STLandrew

Andrew Croy Died Dec 20, 1859 Aged 72y 1m  18d St. Luke Cemetery, Monroe Township, Carroll County, Ohio (For more on Andrew use the site search engine.)

Often we assume that occupations are a family thing, passed from generation to generation. To a certain extent it is true. There are families of teachers, construction workers, even musicians. But the economics of the time and the needs of those inhabitants living in that time play a large role in determining how a family makes a living. I say family because, in the time of Andrew Croy, family usually worked together in the same livelihood. For this family, from at least 1830 to 1869, the profession of wood and mill worker was dominant.

In the early days of our nation, especially on the frontier edge, the inhabitants primary needed housing, food, and a means of transport. Those needs required, first, mills to cut lumber and grind grain (among other things, a nice overview here). Secondly, carpenters and wagon makers skilled in building were in demand. Our family served those needs.

Andrew Croy ran saw and gristmills. He purchased land for a mill on 22 April 1829 in Stark (later Carroll) County, Ohio. He ran that mill until between 20 January 1838 (when he sold 20 acres of that land to Akey Worley) and 27 July 1839 (when he sold the rest to the same).

andrew bark st mill

Site of first of Andrew Croy’s mill, halfway along Bark St, in Carroll County, Ohio

By 20 December 1829, he had moved to White Eyes Township, Coshocton County and purchased a mill from John Gardner, original land grant to John Graham. On 25 March 1856, likely in poor health, he sold the land to David Reed.

andrew mill site

Site of second of Andrew Croy’s mills, one mile NW of Fresno, Ohio in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio 

white eyes

White Eyes Creek–The Carroll County site and Coshocton site were similar in that they both had a rise for the mill above a low lying creek to provide power.

Here is a newspaper account of the mill’s history.

“All three (3) mills stood along the creek banks in White Eyes Township and there was a bustle of rural community activity for weeks out of each year.

The first was located on the Ed Steiner farm, one mile north of Avondale, now Fresno. It was built in 1832 by Thomas Diehl and had an undershot wheel sixteen (16) feet in diameter and about three (3) feet wide.

Two runs of burrs, elevators, a bolting chest and other necessary appliances completed the mechanical equipment for the picturesque affair.

Its two stories towered above the wooded slopes of historic White Eyes creek and stood on a foundation 32 x 40 feet. It was enclosed by lap siding and shaved oak shingles and its capacity was seven to eight bushels of wheat an hour.

The mill was purchased by Andy Croy, father of the late David Croy in 1839 and operated by him for 16 years. [until 1855] Thomas Moore then ran the mill for several years after which David took possession. Two years later David Reed acquired it. [Does not jive with deed date of sale.] When Mr. Reed fell at the battle of Winchester in the Civil War, the mill’s years of service came to an end.”

David Croy lived in Coshocton until his death and continued in the occupation his father taught him.

OKC david croy

Photo from Oak Grove Cemetery, David married Eunice Frazee, 2 April 1846, with whom he had Robert, William, Matthew, Margaret, Mary, Eliza Jane, and Jacob. He later married Hannah McPherson. 

“Several decades ago, the second mill was still in operation. It stood at Boyd’s mills and it was operated for years by its builders, brothers William and Journal Boyd. Today the site is part of Rev. C.D. Firster’s farm.

Later the mill was sold to Robert Doak, who sold it to Robert Boyd, who in turn sold it to Adam Gardner in 1864. Mr. Gardner died in 1872 and the property was sold to Thomas Elliot and he later sold it to J.P. Benjamin in 1881. In 1883 it was again sold, this time to Mr. [David] Croy.

A third mill had stood along White Eyes Creek one mile up stream, it was operated successively by Mr. Headley, Wm Frazy,[Andrew’s sons David and Michael married Frazy/Frazee’s] Andrew Croy and David Reed. It suspended operation in 1860.”

Meanwhile, Andrew’s son Jacob who joined him in Coshocton became a wagon maker, wagons being in demand during the canal days of Coshocton County. Jacob brought his family to Washington County, perhaps floating down the Muskingum River canal improvement where he continued to work as a wagon maker. Jacob’s son, William, briefly owned a sawmill bought in 1869, and son Robert worked as a carpenter.

But times were changing. The steam engine and the movement of civilization into the far west, impacted the needs of the nation and its people. Small local mills slowly faded away. Water as an energy source was replaced by coal. The war spread families apart. We were a nation transformed.

The “good old days” were gone. When I visited David Croy’s gravesite, I met the man who lived there and maintained the cemetery. He told tales of how the lumbermen lived in tents on the Tuscarawas River a small distance south where a dance hall entertained. Across from the gravesite was a small church that had “socials” for the men. The men working lumber might have their “fun” down on the Tuscarawas but usually found their wives at the church socials. Here is how the article explained it.

“Settlers in Coshocton county nearly a century ago [now a century and a half] came many miles to patronize the grist mills, at first on horseback and later in wagons. Each customer waited his turn. During the interval many would unlimber their fishing equipment and combine business with pleasure.

Others spent the time in games and many told of the stories that were related. Evening parties were arranged and old time songs mingled with the beat of dancing feet on the broad beamed floors of the Grist Mill.”

Article printed in the Cemetery History: White Eyes Township Vol XV by the Coshocton County Chapter OGS, pg 174: from an aged newspaper clipping owned by Ed Norris of Fresno, Ohio.
Additional documentation available upon request: Census, Marriage, Land Records

 

Thursday Throwback: Nathan Croy

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side Nathan Ida

Decatur Presbyterian Cemetery, Fairfield Township, Washington County, Ohio

Nathan Croy, the sixth child of Jacob and Margaret Croy, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, April 1, 1844.[i] He moved with his parents from Coshocton County to his brother William’s land near Cutler, Washington County, Ohio around 1860.[ii] He was sixteen. By August 1862, all his brothers except the youngest, Calvin, then not quite 15, had enlisted in the Union Army. He stayed to work the farm. But by May of 1864, Calvin was turning 18 and decided to join as well. Nathan enlisted with him. It was a short tour of duty, 100 days.[iii]

Here is the account from the rolls compiled right after the war by Reverend David C. Perry.

“Nathan Croy, son of Jacob & Margaret Croy was born in Coshocton in 1843 [corrected to 1 Apr. 1844] Went from Fairfield in Co. G 148 O.V.I. Continued on duty through the term of service. At the expiration of which he returned & was discharged with the Regiment. [added…at Camp Marietta, Ohio, 14 Sep. 1864]”

While Calvin reenlisted after their return home, Nathan stayed at the farm. On March 1, 1868, he bought two 50-acre lots from his brother, Greer Croy, who was suffering from consumption.[iv] The land was near Vincent, Ohio, a stones through from Cutler, where his brother lived. His father and mother lived with Nathan until their deaths in 1872 and 1884 respectively.

Nathan married Ida Jane Nelson on January 16, 1875.[v] They had two children: Mary Ethel Croy (born 1881) and Wilford Nathan Croy (born 1888.)[vi] Ida died of heart disease on May 9, 1890[vii] when Wilfred was four and Mary was almost nine. Nathan never remarried. He cared for his children and worked his farm until his death from heart disease at 73 on the 17th of May 1817.[viii] His story is one of simple commitment, to a place and his family.

[i] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-21273-12400-36?cc=1307272 : accessed 22 June 2015), 1917 > 34201-37120 > image 2979 of 3299.
[ii] Grantee William Croy/Grantor Ales., Sarah Johnson; Washington County Courthouse; Deed Book Vol.46 pg. 332 and census records, 1860
[iii] Handwritten Roll of Honor document, compiled by Charles Strong Perry, 1865, Washington County Public Library, History and Genealogical Archive, 418 Washington St., Marietta, OH.
[iv] Grantee Nathan Croy/Grantor Greer, Melona Croy; Washington County Courthouse; Deed Book Vol.69 pg. 94
[v] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-18083-70146-21?cc=1614804 : accessed 22 July 2015), Washington > Marriage records 1864-1880 vol 6 > image 155 of 400; county courthouses, Ohio.
[vi] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-21273-12400-36?cc=1307272 : accessed 22 June 2015), 1917 > 34201-37120 > image 2979 of 3299.
[vii] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11678-154699-14?cc=2128172 : accessed 22 July 2015), Washington > Death records, 1867-1908 > image 309 of 494; county courthouses, Ohio.
[viii] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-21273-12400-36?cc=1307272 : accessed 22 June 2015), 1917 > 34201-37120 > image 2979 of 3299.

 

Throw Back Thursday Tribute:David Croy

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David Croy aloneDavid Croy was born to Jacob Croy and Margaret Pugh Croy.[i] He was their fifth child, likely born in Coshocton County, Ohio. The handwritten rolls, gathered immediately after the Civil War, tell us this.

“David Croy, son of Jacob & Margaret Croy was born in Coshocton Co Oct 4th 1841 (corrected above as Aug 16 1842?) Enlisted from Fairfield Aug 6th (corrected to 8) in Co “G” 92nd O.V.I Was sick first at Carthage Tenn. With a low fever, in April 1863, & lay in Field Hosp. there about two months. Followed the Regt in an ambulance. Taken sick again & off duty fifteen days, in the Camp ____ at Big Springs Tenn. Had the chills at Savannah Ga but remained on duty. Was never wounded, but at “Mission Ridge” one minie ball grazed his thigh, & another, glancing against his cartridge box packed with ammunition was stopped by his beltplate, which was dented deeply & saved his life. Was mustered out with his Cp near Washington D.C. June 10th 1865.”[ii]

His pension records provide this accounting.

“Took cold from exposure on a steamer being transported with his Regt from Nashville to Carthage, Tenn which settled in his throat and lungs, giving him consumption of the lungs…” [iii]

On 12 September 1867, he married Mary Moore.[iv] He bought an 80 acre farm in 1873[v] which he tried to work, though I suspect Mary, his brothers, and friends provided most of the labor as he was already showing the effects of TB including hemorrhaging.[vi] The disease completely disabled him and Mary nursed him during the last four months of his life. He died 10 March 1878.[vii] They had no children.

The text at the bottom of his original grave marker spoke to her loss.

A light from our home is gone

A voice I loved is stilled

A place is vacant in my heart

That never will be filled

Mary never remarried. She continued on her own, working the farm including an additional 70 acres purchased in 1883[viii] and 100 acres purchased from Nathan Croy in 1883.[ix] She died of pneumonia on 1 December 1899 in Vincent, Washington Co, OH.[x]

David Mary Croy

[i] The death certificate would indicate a birth date of August 1840. The origin marker in Decatur Presbyterian Cemetery would indicate 4 October 1841. The marker including Mary from 1899 indicates 16 August 1842. The Rolls show both birthdates. His death certificate says he was born in Fairfield but all evidence points to Jacob and Margaret living in Coshocton in the early 1840’s.
Washington County Probate Court: Death Certificate Vol I pg 104 # 3184 Received June 26, 2015 7:04:10 AM PDT From: Rachel Davis Deputy Clerk
Grave markers Decatur Presbyterian Cemetery, Decatur Township, Washington County OH
[ii] Handwritten Roll of Honor document, compiled by Charles Strong Perry, 1865, Washington County Public Library, History and Genealogical Archive, 418 Washington St., Marietta, OH.
[iii] Soldier’s Certificate No. 679496, David Croy, Corporal, Company G, 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Case Files of Approved Pension applications of Veterans Who Served in the Army and Navy Mainly in the Civil War and the War with Spain (Civil War and Later Survivors’ Certificates), 1861-1934; p. 7; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, National Archives, Washington, DC
[iv] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-18083-62475-34?cc=1614804 : accessed 22 June 2015), Washington > Marriage records 1864-1867 vol 4 > image 360 of 628; county courthouses, Ohio.
[v] Washington County Ohio Court of Records; V 75 Pg 300, Grantor: Fleming; 7 April 1873: S 1/2 SE 1/4 S5 T6 R11
[vi] Ibid note iii pg 23-35
[vii] Ibid note i
[viii] Washington County Ohio Court of Records; V 89 Pg 68, Grantor: Clark; 20 August 1881: 70 Ac Lot61 T2 R10
[ix] Washington County Ohio Court of Records; V 93 Pg 291, Grantor: Croy; 5 April 1883: NE frac 18 T 6 R11
Note: 1880 census shows her with 182 acres, 5 horses, 20 Acres in hay.
[x] Mary Croy, Record of Deaths; Washington County (Ohio) Propate Court; acquired by Donna Croy Wright 31 July 2015