RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Civil War

Ohio Genealogical Society Thank You

My article—The Croy Boys:Seven Sons Serving in the Civil War—is in the just-published OGSQ. Have ancestors from Ohio? Join the Ohio Genealogical Society! It is a fabulous organization, and you get access to so much—including all the Quarterly publications. Go to “Civil War” in blog categories in the right-hand column and find out more about these boys.

Tidbits from a Month’s Hiatus

The Cave: a creation corner

                                                      The Cave: my creation corner

I’ve been knee deep (nose deep?) in the final edits of my first book of historical fiction. I love creating a fiction account from the bits of data and unanswered questions unveiled during my research. While I’ve grown attached to the characters and the story, tentatively titled Mary’s Mountains, it is time to move on. After cleaning up what my husband calls my “cave”, I wrote a page long list of long neglected “to do’s”. Number one on the list? Update this blog! Two big genealogy wins occurred while I hunted out misplaced commas and redundancies in my book. Here they are:

  1. In the last week of September, I received notice that my applications were approved in the Society of Civil War Families of Ohio based upon my descent from these Civil War veterans: Calvin Harrison Croy, Robert Croy, William Croy, Greer Croy, David Croy, Nathan Croy, and Duncan Croy.

I’ve written about them extensively on my blog (just search Civil War).

Now all marriage, birth, death, obituary, and military documentation from that application can be access through the Ohio Genealogical Society. If you have Ohio ancestry or an interest in learning more about a pivotal state in our nation’s history, I recommend them. www.ogs.org

I will attend the 2016 OGS Conference in Mason, Ohio, April 28-30, 2016, receive my certificate, and then take my own two week research tour of Ohio. I’ll post more about the conference later.

  1. Soon after receiving the above notification, my mail box offered up another treasure…a copy of the will and probate records for Alexander Huston. They come from the original documents housed at the Montgomery County, Ohio Records Center and Archives. I have only found these records summarized, transcribed, or in partial form until now. Unfortunately, the records, from an oversized register, were shrunk down to 8×11 paper, so transcribing will take a while! (Besides the fact that there are 40 pages to transcribe.)

Already, there are some exciting discoveries, like why John Huston sued in court to retrieve his father’s property from his mother’s new husband, and why Alexander’s will gave money to children already dead…but that is for a different post. Stay tuned.

One last thing…I attended the Fresno Genealogical Society all day conference starring Lisa Louise Cooke. Combined with the fact that I shared the event with two good friends, the conference was excellent and well-organized. I first saw Lisa Louise Cooke at the San Antonio, 2014, conference of the Federation of Genealogical Societies. She is always fabulous and informative. FresnoGS on facebook https://www.facebook.com/FresnoGenealogy Lisa Louise Cooke www.lisalouisecooke.com

Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part Five

Sheridan's Ride at Cedar Creek October 19, 1864 by A.R. Waud

Sheridan’s Ride at Cedar Creek
October 19, 1864 by A.R. Waud

The five Croy boys who fought together on the Western Theatre received new orders. After taking Missionary Ridge in Tennessee and securing the supply lines and strategic placement of Chattanooga, the 92nd with Robert, William, Duncan, and David Croy moved south with Sherman. Having completed the three-year obligation to serve, the 36th was due to disband. They moved north, returning to Ohio.

The Union desperately needed these volunteers to reenlist. They were transported to Columbus where Governor John Broughin garlanded them with acclaim. He also explained an incentive plan. If a significant percent of the regiment reenlisted, they would be honored with the title of “veteran” for their regiment and each man reenlisting would receive a $100 bonus. They squeaked by with the required percentage. On February 15, 1864 329 men were sworn into the 36th Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Among them was Greer Croy.

As part of the “negotiations,” the 36th received two out of the three things they requested. They would receive a 30-day leave to rest and visit family. They would not receive the Spencer repeating rifles they had seen in use in Tennessee. They would be transferred to serve under George Crook, now Brigadier General of the Kanawha Division of West Virginia.

When Greer Croy arrived home for his thirty days of recuperation in March of 1864, he was greeted by a proud father, relieved and still anxious mother, and two awed brothers, all of them bursting with their own questions. By the time Greer left to join Crook in West Virginia on March 29, 1864, his presence had convinced the last two brothers that they could wait no longer. Well, maybe he had only convinced Calvin. Calvin was young and filled with stories of adventure, and he turned eighteen years of age on May 13th. A regiment formed in that month, but mother Margaret would not send another boy off alone.

On May 2, 1864, Calvin and Nathan Croy, 20 years of age, joined the newly forming 148th OVI for a 100 day term.[i]Their service began in disaster. Barely out of Ohio, the train carrying the boys crashed. It killed a local boy in the regiment and injuring many. Calvin and Nathan went on to Washington, D.C. to man the trenches protecting the Capital. They were mustered out on September 14, 1864. Later Calvin would join his brothers in the 92nd marching through the Carolinas. But for one hundred days all seven of Margaret and Jacob’s boys were in the Civil War together.

At the same time, Crook and Greer’s 36th had received orders to destroy the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Traveling light, living off the land, with orders to do no “indiscriminate marauding,” they marched through rain and mud along the Kanawha River, disrupting supply flow and creating havoc for the Confederacy. With the Battle of Cloyd’s Mountain in Virginia, they accomplished the shut down that railroad and moved up the Shenandoah Valley.

Lacking supplies and equipment while battling heat, fatigue, and the guerilla tactics of the Rebels, they lingered on the verge of collapse. Then, in August of 1864, Major General Philip Sheridan arrived with 35, 000 troops. They rallied.

The culminating battle came at Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864. Thinking they now dominated the valley and the front, Sheridan had moved out to focus on Lee. But Major General Early of the Confederacy surprised the Union forces, causing general panic. The 36th held the line, and Sheridan, with word of the danger, returned to rally the troops. Many depict the moment as the now famous, if somewhat overly dramatic, “Sheridan’s Ride.”

There were 5,700 casualties at Cedar Creek with 554 killed. Greer Croy suffered his third and final wound of the war. He was mustered out to go home on March 18, 1865 with a surgeon’s certificate of disability.

Note: For further information http://www.ohiocivilwar.com (regiment timelines and other interesting facts) http://www.ohiocivilwar150.org/omeka/ (flags of regiments.) http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com (excellent outline of battles, regiments, etc.) and Kenneth P. Werrell, Crook’s Regulars: the 36th Ohio in the War of Rebellion (Christianburg, Virginia, KPW, 2012)

[i] NARA. U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 (Ancestry.com) T288_105, also Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) pg 755-756 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M (Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.)

 

Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part Three

Transport on the Tennessee River Taylor & Huntington

Transport on the Tennessee River
Taylor & Huntington

Imagine your 16-year-old son telling you that he is going to war. He can stand aside no longer, not while his brother fights in a war consuming the Nation. What do you say or do? If you are Jacob and Margaret Croy, it seems, you send your eldest son along to protect him. You are family. Duncan Croy, age 16, signed up for the war on the same day as his brother Robert, age 28. They volunteered for a three-year term in the 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company G, on August 5, 1862. Greer gave his age as 18. All death, census, and supporting data show his age to be sixteen at the time.[i] Robert, who would muster out as corporal, now had three children between the ages of six and two.

Now imagine these two are your brothers who are joining with another brother already serving in this historic conflict. Do you stay behind? You are young, idealistic, and you are family. William Croy, aged 25, enlisted with the same company in the 92nd only four days later, August 9, 1862. Like brothers Robert and Greer, he would muster out as a corporal. David Croy joined, at 20 years of age, on August 15, 1862. Within a ten-day period, they had all joined the war. Now only Calvin and Nathan stayed home to help their parents and watch after the families of William and Robert. [ii]

The 92nd proceeded to Gallipolis, Ohio for training with Austrian rifled muskets. By October they moved into the Kanawha Valley and into the brigade of General George Crook. With him was Greer Croy, serving in the 36th OVI.

Now the story of five brothers joins, briefly and dramatically. All five brothers now were serving in the war under the same General but in different regiments. They were dispatched by Ohio River transport to Nashville, Tennessee and then on to Carthage. In the two months spent in Carthage, they buried more than 90 men to disease.

In June they headed through endless rain to Big Springs, Tennessee. Here General John Turchin took command. A colorful and portly immigrant from Hungary, he would lead the brothers successfully through the next infamous campaign. First, though he would secure “green corn, blackberries, and fresh vegetables, speedily [eradicate] all traces of scurvy and disease contracted at Carthage…” [iii] His wife, Nadine, who followed him in battle, supported his efforts.

by Alfred Edwards Mathews

by Alfred Edwards Mathews

By September of 1863 the Army of the Cumberland had arrived in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The battles along the Georgia/Tennessee line loomed before them, ones that would tip the scale of the war.

Note: Copyright free photos from Library of Congress Prints and Photographs www.loc.gov/pictures

Next: the 36th OVI and the 92nd OVI in the Battle of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge.

[i] 1860 U.S. census, Fairfield, Washington, Ohio; Roll: M653_1048; Page: 124 Image: 251; Family History Library Film: 805048 from NARA microfilm publication accessed through ancestry.com also 1850, 1870, 1880, 1900. 1910, and death cert.
[ii] Roster Commission by authority of General Assembly, Official roster of the soldiers of the state of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 9 (Cincinnati: The Ohio Valley Pub. & Mfg. Co., 141 and 143 Race St., 1886) Books. Google.com
[iii] Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) pg 692 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M
Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.