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YES! Jacob Croy is the son of Andrew Croy

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signatures of Parent and son

Together on a legal transaction with information on their literacy. (On another document it shows Susanna signing with her mark.) I was pretty excited to see this!

Parents and children care for each other. They support each other. They help each other in their undertakings. Long ago they worked together and lived with each other far into adulthood. As now, when things were tough grandparents cared for grandchildren, and they often bought and sold property together. Love and support (and, yes, its opposite) are human qualities, past and present.

I went to Ohio hoping to find evidence that Jacob Croy was the son of Andrew Croy. Mind you, I knew it was true. But, for genealogists, proximity, as in living in the same place and even the same house, is not definitive proof of a familial relationship. Still, at some point, can’t all that coinciding evidence be considered “proof?”

I knew a great deal before my trip. (Rehashed below.[i]) From this information, I surmised that Duncan, Michael, Richard, Samuel, and my great-great grandfather Jacob were sons of Andrew. Various age estimates fit the 1820 census information. Referencing only my source information, the names of two sons, one born 1811-1820 and another born 1826-1830 were unknown. The names of two daughters born 1811-1815 and 1821-1825 were also unknown. Now all but one of those names can be confirmed through evidence.

So, what new documentation did I find?

  • Mary Croy married Robert Russell on 14 February 1835 in Carroll County.[ii]
  • Mary died in Carroll County of consumption 11 June 1871. She was born in Jefferson County to “parents Andrew and Susannah Croy.”[iii]
  • Then there was this lovely obituary.[iv] “Matthew Russell who died at the dawning of the 29th day of August 1881 was born May 27th 1818, on the farm on which he died­–his father having entered that piece in 1812…Mr. Russell was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Croy on the 18th of August, 1840, and leaves his widow and six children (we believe all the family) to morn his departure…”
  • And this gem from a synopsis of an “aged newspaper clipping owned by Ed Norris of Fresno [Ohio]…The mill was purchased by Andy Croy, father of the late David Croy in 1839 and operated by him for 16 years.”[v] I found the deed in which Andrew sells that land on the 25th of March 1856. It outlines the history of the property including the previous date of purchase and ownership.[vi]
  • Finally, how about two couples named Croy selling, together, a piece of land in Coshocton County? The document includes the names of both Andrew and Jacob and their wives. And the land is adjacent to, and in the same White Eyes Township and same section and range, S6 R 5, as the land with the mill.[vii] (See photo above)

I think I have a vast body of proof to substantiate my claim. The two daughters are Mary and Margaret whom Andrew and Susannah went to live with after selling the mill. The youngest son is David, who stayed in Coshocton County all his life. The last son…well there is always more history to discover.

What I do know is close to heart. Family takes care of each other, supports each other…or not. The choice matters. Andrew and Susannah chose to foster that connection. And Jacob was their son.

[i]
  • Mathias Croy married Susan Pugh on 4 January 1816 in Brown Township, Stark/Carroll County[i], Ohio (He and Andrew are the only Croy males of age to be Jacob’s father in Stark/Carroll County. Jacob was born 6 March 1810.)
  • Mathias Croy, according to Stark County Tax Records from 1826-1830, lived continuously in Rose Township
  • On the 1820 census, Andrew Croy and a female, born 1776-1794, lived in Brown Township, Stark/Carroll County with 2 boys born 1801-1810 and 4 boys and 1 girl born 1811-1820.
  • Andrew and family, according to the Stark County Tax Records from 1826-1830, continued living in Brown Township through 1828.
  • Andrew bought land in Rose Township, Stark/Carroll County, Ohio on 2 April 1829.
  • Jacob Croy married Margaret Pugh in Stark/Carroll County, Ohio on 5 April 1830.
  • On the 1830 census, four Croy families lived in Rose Township (one township away from Brown), Stark/Carroll County, Ohio:
    • Andrew and a female, born 1776-1794, with one boy, born 1801-1810, 1 boy and 1 girl, born 1811-1815, 1 girl, born 1821-1825 and 1 son, born 1826-1830
    • Duncan and a female, born 1801-1810, with 1 boy and 1 girl, born 1826-1830
    • Jacob and a female, born 1801-1810
    • Mathias and a female, born 1776-1794, 1 boy and 1 girl born 1816-1820, 1 boy and 1 girl born 1821-1825, 1 boy and 1 girl born 1826-1830
  • Andrew Croy paid taxes on lot 18 in Morges, Rose Township Ohio from 1833-1838.
  • Jacob Croy paid taxes on a lot 17 in Morges, Rose Township from 1833-1835
  • Michael Croy paid taxes on lot 24 in Morges, Rose Township from 1833-1835.
  • On the 1840 census, two Croy families lived in White eyes Township, Coshocton County, Oh
    • Andrew Croy born 1871-1880, lived with a female born 1781-1790, 1 male born 1801-1810, 1 boy and 1 girl born 1821-1825, 1 boy born 1831-1835, and 1 girl born 1836-1840.
    • Michael Croy born 1801-1810 with a female born 1811-1820, a girl born 1831-1835, and a boy born 1836-1840.
  • On the 1840 census, two Croy families with the head of household named Jacob lived in Coshocton County
    • Jacob of Washington County who had lived in the township and county on previous census records since 1820 at least…so not our Jacob.
    • Jacob Croy born 1801-1810 lived in Mill Creek Township, Coshocton County with a female and male born 1811-1820, 1 boy and 1 girl born 1831-1835, and 1 boy born 1836-1840.
  • One Croy, Richard, born 1811-1820 with a female born 1815-1821 and a boy under 5.
  • Samuel Croy married Catherine McClish 10 February 1837.
[ii] Robert Russell and Mary Croy marriage record, 14 February 1835; Carroll county Genealogical Library, 24 2nd St NE, Carrollton, Ohio; V I Marriage Records, pg 38.
[iii] Mary Russell death record, 11 June 1871; Carroll County Genealogical Library,24 2nd St NE, Carrollton, Ohio; Record of Deaths, Probate Court, pg 36-38, # 98.
[iv] Matthew Russell obituary; Carroll Chronicle, Carrollton, Ohio, 2 September 1881; Carroll County Genealogical Library, pg 35.
[v] Coshocton County Chapter of OGS, White Eyes Township, Coshocton County: Cemeteries…Brief History… Vol. XV: “The First Grist Mill 1832 on White Eyes Creek pg 174.
[vi] Deed: Andrew Croy to David Reed; Coshocton County Deed Book, V 31, Pg 754; Coshocton County Records Office, Coshocton, OH.
[vii] Deed: Jacob & Andrew Croy to William Adams; Coshocton County Deed Book, V 23, Pg 421; Coshocton County Records Office, Coshocton, OH.

Seven Brothers and the War of Rebellion: Part Three

Transport on the Tennessee River Taylor & Huntington

Transport on the Tennessee River
Taylor & Huntington

Imagine your 16-year-old son telling you that he is going to war. He can stand aside no longer, not while his brother fights in a war consuming the Nation. What do you say or do? If you are Jacob and Margaret Croy, it seems, you send your eldest son along to protect him. You are family. Duncan Croy, age 16, signed up for the war on the same day as his brother Robert, age 28. They volunteered for a three-year term in the 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company G, on August 5, 1862. Greer gave his age as 18. All death, census, and supporting data show his age to be sixteen at the time.[i] Robert, who would muster out as corporal, now had three children between the ages of six and two.

Now imagine these two are your brothers who are joining with another brother already serving in this historic conflict. Do you stay behind? You are young, idealistic, and you are family. William Croy, aged 25, enlisted with the same company in the 92nd only four days later, August 9, 1862. Like brothers Robert and Greer, he would muster out as a corporal. David Croy joined, at 20 years of age, on August 15, 1862. Within a ten-day period, they had all joined the war. Now only Calvin and Nathan stayed home to help their parents and watch after the families of William and Robert. [ii]

The 92nd proceeded to Gallipolis, Ohio for training with Austrian rifled muskets. By October they moved into the Kanawha Valley and into the brigade of General George Crook. With him was Greer Croy, serving in the 36th OVI.

Now the story of five brothers joins, briefly and dramatically. All five brothers now were serving in the war under the same General but in different regiments. They were dispatched by Ohio River transport to Nashville, Tennessee and then on to Carthage. In the two months spent in Carthage, they buried more than 90 men to disease.

In June they headed through endless rain to Big Springs, Tennessee. Here General John Turchin took command. A colorful and portly immigrant from Hungary, he would lead the brothers successfully through the next infamous campaign. First, though he would secure “green corn, blackberries, and fresh vegetables, speedily [eradicate] all traces of scurvy and disease contracted at Carthage…” [iii] His wife, Nadine, who followed him in battle, supported his efforts.

by Alfred Edwards Mathews

by Alfred Edwards Mathews

By September of 1863 the Army of the Cumberland had arrived in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The battles along the Georgia/Tennessee line loomed before them, ones that would tip the scale of the war.

Note: Copyright free photos from Library of Congress Prints and Photographs www.loc.gov/pictures

Next: the 36th OVI and the 92nd OVI in the Battle of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge.

[i] 1860 U.S. census, Fairfield, Washington, Ohio; Roll: M653_1048; Page: 124 Image: 251; Family History Library Film: 805048 from NARA microfilm publication accessed through ancestry.com also 1850, 1870, 1880, 1900. 1910, and death cert.
[ii] Roster Commission by authority of General Assembly, Official roster of the soldiers of the state of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 9 (Cincinnati: The Ohio Valley Pub. & Mfg. Co., 141 and 143 Race St., 1886) Books. Google.com
[iii] Martin R. Andrews, edited and compiled, History of Marietta and Washington county, Ohio and representative citizens, Vol. 1 (Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, 1902) pg 692 https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6573096M
Includes interesting accounts of each Ohio regiments service from the perspective of the late 1800’s.

Who was Margaret Pugh Croy’s father?

Detail of page of marriage record: Margaret Pugh and Jacob Croy

Detail of page of marriage record: Margaret Pugh and Jacob Croy

If your eyes are glazing just looking at this diatribe then read the bolded items and move on. Believe me, I understand. My hope was to reveal the thought and effort I put into my research.

I last wrote regarding assumptions concerning the ancestry of Margaret Pugh who married my great, great grandfather Jacob Croy that were incorrect. At the time I wasn’t even positive of her last name. I’ve done additional research and here is where I stand currently (and where I will leave her lineage for now.)

While I had seen dates for Margaret’s marriage to Jacob Croy, I had no solid evidence. I do now. Rummaging through Family Search for the hundredth time, I discovered a digital copy of the document confirming the marriage of Margaret Pugh to Jacob Croy, April 5, 1830.[i] I got all “jump up and down” excited, but it seems the document had been sitting in a number of genealogies for some time. Still…now it is:

  • Fact number 1: Margaret with the last name PUGH married Jacob Croy in Stark County on April 5, 1830

I now knew with some certainty Margaret’s last name of “Pugh” and not one of the other names bantered about in family lore. (Yes, it could be a second name taken before she married Jacob at 17 but not likely.)

I started looking much more closely at records. I analyzed the records of all “Pugh” names in the 1820 and 1830 census data. I had previously reviewed tax and land records for Rose Township in Stark County and neighboring townships as well. From this information I extracted the following.

  • Fact number 2: Aaron Pugh and John Pugh purchased sections in Township 15, range 6 only 3 sections (in Aaron Pugh’s case) from Andrew Croy and Jacob Oswalt in Township 16, Range 7 of then Stark County, Ohio[ii]
  • Fact number 3: Aaron, John, and Daniel Pugh lived in Rose Township, Stark County, Ohio in 1820 based on the 1820 census.[iii]
  • Fact number 4: In that same 1820 census, only Daniel and John had a female child aged appropriately to have been Margaret.[iv]
  • Facts number 5, 6, 7: Based on the 1830 census, John was, by then, the only Pugh left living in the in Rose Township. There was a female, not shown on the 1820 census, between 30-39. John lived next to Jacob Croy and Mathias Croy, both who married Pughs. [v]

While not definitive, by inference it seems likely that Margaret was the daughter of John Pugh whose wife had died by 1820 and had remarried by 1830. This would fit vaguely into the lore from family stories that Margaret was somehow connected to a Smith, Woods, or Scott. But that story indicates that her father was killed coming home from a war and her mother remarried. Nothing I find (and I investigated all the Smith, Woods, and Scott names for Carroll and Stark Counties, plus West Virginia records on line) indicates that this story has any validity.

It is still possible that Daniel Pugh was her father as he had a girl child of the same age range in 1820. It is also possible that the records for John Pugh in 1820 were inaccurate and the 16-18 year old girl is the same woman in 1830 listed as 30-39. It is also possible that the neighbor relationships were coincidental. Nothing I found is unarguable except her marriage to Jacob, but I think my inference is the most likely. She remains a mystery, for now.[vi] Not a mystery: she raised 3 daughters and 7 sons who all served the Union in the Civil War. That, by inference, takes an amazing woman. Those boys and their service will be the focus of the next few entries.

[i] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-17790-60550-48?cc=1614804 : accessed 05 Sep 2014), Stark > Marriage records 1809-1836 vol A > image 132 of 201.
[ii] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Township Plats of Selected States; Series #: T1234; Roll: 50.Source Information: U.S., Indexed Early Land Ownership and Township Plats, 1785-1898 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data:Public Land Survey Township Plats, compiled 1789–1946, documenting the period 1785–1946. NARA microfilm publication T1234, 67 rolls. Records of the Bureau of Land Management, 1685–2006, Record Group 49. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.
[iii] 1820 U.S. census, Rose, Stark County, Ohio population schedule, p.192: digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessedSept. 9, 2014); from National Archives microfilm publication M33, roll 94, image 229.
[iv] ibid
[v] 1830 U.S. Census, Rose, Stark, Ohio, population schedule, p. 207 FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 06 Sep 2014); citing “1830 United States Federal Census,” Ancestry.com;, NARA microfilm publication M19, roll 140
[vi] As an aside, John Pugh is listed as the son of Aaron Pugh in most genealogies, documentation not confirmed

Treat #8 for a New Year: Reminiscence about Jacob and Margaret Croy

“The house was built by her grandfather Jacob. He also had a shop and made coffins for the departed of the neighborhood. Grandmother was a hardworking, high tempered lady, who cooked the food for all their ten children on a crane in the fireplace. She baked all the bread in an iron sort of pot in front of the fireplace by placing hot coals on top and around it. She had a loom and wove all the material to make clothing. She raised the flax, carded and spun the thread, then wove it into material. She used the bark of trees for dyes for the materials.”

This is just part of a two page reminiscence found while going through some papers given to me by my cousin’s wife. An unknown Margaret Croy wrote it about her great grandmother and grandfather. Her great grandmother, for whom she was named, Margaret Pugh Croy, was my great, great grandmother and lived from 1813 to 1884, mostly in southern Ohio. In this paragraph she repeats recollections of Agnes Schoonover Knowles, a grandchild of Jacob and Margaret.

While there is no picture to post here, an early one does exist. She indicates this in her writing and I would love to find it! Pictures help us visualize a person and their world, but it is paragraphs like this that magically bring both to life. Keep a diary, write a letter, jot down a memory and tuck it away, for what is ordinary now will be extraordinary when viewed, in a different time, through another’s eyes.