RSS Feed

Tag Archives: probate records

Tidbits from a Month’s Hiatus

The Cave: a creation corner

                                                      The Cave: my creation corner

I’ve been knee deep (nose deep?) in the final edits of my first book of historical fiction. I love creating a fiction account from the bits of data and unanswered questions unveiled during my research. While I’ve grown attached to the characters and the story, tentatively titled Mary’s Mountains, it is time to move on. After cleaning up what my husband calls my “cave”, I wrote a page long list of long neglected “to do’s”. Number one on the list? Update this blog! Two big genealogy wins occurred while I hunted out misplaced commas and redundancies in my book. Here they are:

  1. In the last week of September, I received notice that my applications were approved in the Society of Civil War Families of Ohio based upon my descent from these Civil War veterans: Calvin Harrison Croy, Robert Croy, William Croy, Greer Croy, David Croy, Nathan Croy, and Duncan Croy.

I’ve written about them extensively on my blog (just search Civil War).

Now all marriage, birth, death, obituary, and military documentation from that application can be access through the Ohio Genealogical Society. If you have Ohio ancestry or an interest in learning more about a pivotal state in our nation’s history, I recommend them. www.ogs.org

I will attend the 2016 OGS Conference in Mason, Ohio, April 28-30, 2016, receive my certificate, and then take my own two week research tour of Ohio. I’ll post more about the conference later.

  1. Soon after receiving the above notification, my mail box offered up another treasure…a copy of the will and probate records for Alexander Huston. They come from the original documents housed at the Montgomery County, Ohio Records Center and Archives. I have only found these records summarized, transcribed, or in partial form until now. Unfortunately, the records, from an oversized register, were shrunk down to 8×11 paper, so transcribing will take a while! (Besides the fact that there are 40 pages to transcribe.)

Already, there are some exciting discoveries, like why John Huston sued in court to retrieve his father’s property from his mother’s new husband, and why Alexander’s will gave money to children already dead…but that is for a different post. Stay tuned.

One last thing…I attended the Fresno Genealogical Society all day conference starring Lisa Louise Cooke. Combined with the fact that I shared the event with two good friends, the conference was excellent and well-organized. I first saw Lisa Louise Cooke at the San Antonio, 2014, conference of the Federation of Genealogical Societies. She is always fabulous and informative. FresnoGS on facebook https://www.facebook.com/FresnoGenealogy Lisa Louise Cooke www.lisalouisecooke.com

Probate Records: Why Historians, Genealogists, and Writers Should Love Them

Mary Moore Croy never remarried after David Croy's death in 1878 at 35. The inventory gives insight into her life and interests.

Mary Moore Croy never remarried after David Croy’s death in 1878 at 35. The inventory gives insight into her life and interests.

How excited can one genealogy/history/historical fiction writer get…over probate records?

  • Historically, you discover what ordinary people valued and find hints regarding social hierarchies.
  • Genealogically, the records can provide answers to specific genealogical questions, from the names and relationships of heirs to the actual death date of the deceased, not to mention unveiling the personalities of those involved.
  • For writers, these records paint a picture, through the details found there, of the life they lived.

I didn’t have time to delve any new records on-line. I was busy with the “final” edits of my book of historical fiction based on my Pennsylvania family history and starting a new one on my New Haven roots. So I tried to ignore the big event, Ancestry’s grand reveal of a host of new will and probate records. I tried. I couldn’t do it, and I am so glad I gave in and took a peak!

With a special shout out to the distant cousins, and anyone else out there who follows my blog-search these records! Unfortunately, if you didn’t log on during the Labor Day weekend, Ancestry’s freebie “come-on” has passed. But the information is worth gold (well, come on, I’m a history nerd).

One caveat, the records are NOT complete, so don’t forget to contact individual courthouses and libraries. For example, of all 88 of the Ohio Counties, only eight are included.

I recommend going directly to the new information on the Ancestry site. Here’s how:

  1. After logging on to Ancestry, make sure you are on their home page.
  2. At the top you will see “New and Exclusive U.S. Wills and Probate Records.” Click “Search Now”
  3. There you may begin your search, get a quick introduction, or view a research guide. Note: you must view all this on their new site. They are encouraging those who use Ancestry to break away from the old version of their search site.
  4. Now put in the name you are interested in researching. I used surname only so I could browse with my family sheets in mind.

What did I find so far? (I say so far because it will take some time to ferret out all the wonders hiding in these records.)

  1. Probate records for Alexander Huston, Montgomery County (father of Mary Huston Croy Roberts…the heroine in my book of historical fiction), including wonderful tidbits like the fact that he owned a Rhone, Sorrel, and Bay mare and colts. Also, his wife, Mary Ann, purchase 8 yds Muslin for $5, 1 and ¾ gallons whiskey for $1.32, and 1 lb coffee for $.50. The purchases of other family members are also recorded.[i]
  2. The will of Jacob Oswalt II who married Sarah Huston. (Parents of Susannah Oswalt who married Andrew Croy, my 3x great-grandfather.) Recorded in Seneca County, where he finally ended up, it includes this comment “Michael Oswalts, John Oswalts, Samuel Oswalts, Jacob Oswalts and Joseph Oswalts…each one Dollar to be paid out of my money that Jacob Shoe Jr has in his possession…” His daughters split the proceeds from the “two forty acre lots lying in Big Spring Township, and one town lot lying in the town of Springville, Seneca County, Ohio…” (I also found the records of Jacob Oswalt’s father, his stepbrother, and his son.)[ii]
  3. The names of two of Edward Huston’s children. (A son of Alexander)[iii]
  4. The will of Mat(t)hias Croy (likely brother of Jacob Croy, husband of Mary Huston, out of Londonderry Township, Bedford PA) which included the married names of his daughters.[iv]
  5. The probate record of John Croy (again, the likely brother of Jacob Croy) where, on one of many pages, I found this: “…money on hand at the decease of John Croy on the 2nd of August 1824” (and the records of a number of his children).[v]

And then, when I didn’t think it could get any better, this e-mail arrived: “I have copied the handwritten recording of the will of Alexander Houston.  I have also copied the Chancery Record of John Huston v. Henry McGrath (40 pages).  For these copies and postage, please send $10.05” So, never let Ancestry or any on-line source be the only place you research. If you aren’t lucky enough to live where you’re researching, a letter (snail or e-version) and a stamp do wonders.

Media credit:Probate Records of Mary Moore Croy, wife of David Croy: 1 December 1899. Washington County Probate Court, 205 Putnam St., Marietta, OH. Microfilm Copies: acquired 13 August 2015.

[i] Ancestry.com. Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 [database on-line, accessed 9 September 2015] Montgomery County, Ohio, Case # 139, Ca. 1810-1887; Probate Place: Montgomery, Ohio.

[ii] Ancestry.com. Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 [database on-line, accessed 9 September 2015] Probate Records, 1828-1954; Probate Place: Seneca, Ohio; Probate Date: 26 September 1836.

[iii] Ancestry.com. Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 [database on-line, accessed 9 September 2015] Montgomery County, Ohio, Case # 3234, Ca. 1841-1861; Probate Place: Montgomery, Ohio.

[iv] Ancestry.com. Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 [database on-line, accessed 9 September 2015] Will Records, 1804-1919; General Index to Estates, 1801-1935: Ohio. Probate Court (Belmont County); Probate Date: 9 October 1837.

[v] Ancestry.com. Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998 [database on-line, accessed 9 September 2015] Montgomery County, Ohio, Estate Files #597-666, # 659, Ca. 1810-1887; Probate Place: Montgomery, Ohio.