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A Second Edition and a Plea for Help

 

Scattering

Purchase or write a review HERE.

It’s up! The second edition of The Scattering of Stones is now available on Amazon. I am very proud of it. (I don’t easily admit such things.) It corrects a few minor errors, has a clean, very readable interior, and sports a fabulous new cover created by Pam Mullins. The cover design visually links the upcoming books in the series, which I have dubbed THE MAGGIE CHRONICLES.

When I first wrote The Scattering of Stones, I had no idea that Maggie Smith, the “present day” researcher in my historical novel, would decide that she was not done! Her fictional research (combined with my real research) unearthed more stories, and she insisted I tell them. Maggie is a very persistent woman.

To those who read Scattering when it first came out, enjoyed it, and then wrote great reviews and sent heartwarming notes, I thank you.

Now I need your help!

If you read my first book and enjoyed it, please write a review for the version showing the cover above. Just click here, scroll down to where it says, “Write a customer review,” click again, and write away. Or you could just cut and paste your old review to the page—or simply give the book a star rating with no comment. I would appreciate it so much.

Here is why!

My previous publisher and I are having trouble pulling the old version of Scattering from Amazon’s on-line sales. Because that edition has more reviews attached to it, and because Amazon does not transfer reviews to second editions, the old version comes up first in a search.  That version is no longer under my copyright, so until it is pulled (except, of course, for used versions), I’d like to bury it under my new, fabulous, edition.

OH—and if you haven’t read Scattering, it has been very well received. If you like historical fiction, in particular American historical fiction, I’d love for you to give it a read. Find a blurb, along with a colored map and short story to compliment the book, on the Moonset Books page above.

THE MAGGIE CHRONICLES, Book Two, The Forging of Frost, set in 17thcentury New Haven Colony, comes out in early January. Book Three, The Legacy of Payne,which takes place in Bennington County, Vermont at the time of the Revolutionary War, is in draft stage, and Maggie’s been whispering two more stories to me, as well. Okay, I wouldn’t call it whispering, but she’ll have to wait.

An Account of Frontier Revolutionary Service: Nicholas Lyberger

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“In the fall of the year 1776, in the month of November about the 15th the Indians made an incursion into Morrison’s Cove in Bedford County and burnt Ulrick’s Mill and Killed all Ulrick’s family but one who was absent at the time. On this occasion all the volunteers and Militia of Bedford county were called out and some from Conegocheague. We were collected at the town of Bedford and Col Davidson of the Militia took the command. I was then as a volunteer in the company commanded by Lieutenant Oserwalt.”

The above quote provides a small taste of the extreme conditions endured by those who chose to live on the edge of the Pennsylvania frontier in the 1700’s. The hazards amplified as the Shawnee and Iroquis began escalating their attacks, stirred by British promises to ban settlements west of the Ohio River in exchange for their support. As I hinted in an earlier posting, the most vivid accountings of frontier life in the 18th century come from first person recollections. Revolutionary pensions were long offered only to those unable to make a living on their own. But an 1832 law offered pensions to all who served in the war, as well as their widows. If the veteran did not have a record of service, he would submit a petition through his state of residence and include an extensive personal narrative. These first-hand accounts are extraordinary resources. Nicolas Lybarger (Liebarger/Liberger etc.) who lived in the Will’s Creek area of then Cumberland Valley Township, Bedford County (later Londonderry Township) provided a fabulous narrative in his petition. Portions have been quoted in other historical accounts. I have transcribed the complete petition here. Petition of Nicholas Lyberger for Revolutionary War Pension The “Oserwalt” mentioned here is Michael Oswalt, son of Jacob Oswalt Sr. Hustons and Croys probably also participated in these excursions. (See Outline of inhabitants of Wills Creek from the previous post.) Later, in April of 1847, the wife of Nicholas, Christina Lyberger, petitioned for widow’s benefits. Her daughter Elizabeth Devore placed her mark by her name proving the veracity of the claim. Included was a page copied from a family bible by Nicholas Lyberger, a “Dutch” bible as the record states.  While mostly illegible (He copied it but made a mark when he signed his name so likely didn’t understand what he copied.) the name Croy appears at the bottom of the page, just another testament to the closely connected families of the Will’s Creek settlement.