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Samuel Payne in Sunderland, Vermont

 

 

Sunderland D Ramsey collection

Sunderland, Bennington County, Vermont Map from David Rumsey Map Collection; Beers, Fredrick W., 1869; Atlas of Bennington County, VT.;Beers, Ellis, & Soule, NY.

I am currently obsessed with Bennington County, Vermont—in particular the township of Sunderland. My reasons?

  1. Samuel Payne, my 4 times great-grandfather[i] lived in Sunderland.
  2. My work in progress fictionalizes Samuel’s time in Sunderland during the Revolutionary War.
  3. My husband and I travel to New England in October, and Bennington is one of our stops.

As usual, the deeper I dig into an area the more details I uncover. Consequently, I’m deep into smallpox and early inoculation, the Green Mountain Boys, the impact of the Revolutionary War on the area, and the conflict between New York and New Hampshire Colonies over the Grants. A stickler for original sources, I am devouring (slowly—it’s a huge banquet) the town records for Sunderland, Manchester, and Bennington found via FamilySearch Wiki. If you have ancestors from Bennington County, I highly recommended these resources.

When I started searching the Sunderland records (See my first post and second post.), I got so excited by what I found that I neglected the first commandment of research—thoroughly document sources. In this case, I omitted the image number for my information, making it hard to return to it. So, back I went to the Family History Center, the only place I can access these records.

This time while carefully documenting, I also worked through the documents more systematically. The Sunderland records are not chronological, have multiple page numbering systems, and mix ear marks, town minutes, vital records, and land records. They require a page-by-page skim and scan approach. And PRESTO!

I found the record for Samuel Payne’s land purchase in Sunderland, Vermont. As I’ve said too many times, I LOVE LAND RECORDS. You can discover so much. Here is an annotated version of Samuel’s deed[ii] to highlight what one land deed can reveal. Note: (?)=illegible I omitted a large section of legal verification in the interest of clarity, but you can find the complete transcript here. Samuel Payne_s deed for land purchase in SunderlandAn endnote corresponds to each bolded portion of the deed.

“Know all men by these (?) that I Stephen Washburn of Sunderland in the County Albany and Province of New York yoman[iii] for aand in consideration of the sum of Sixty Eight pound[iv] Lawfull money to me is paid By Samuel Payen of Williamstown in the County of Burkshire In the Province of the Massetchuset Bay yoman[v] the Receipt where of I do hereby acknowledge & have given granted Bargained (?) and convey and confirm to him the said Samuel Payen his heirs and assign for Ever all my Right title interest claim and Demand I leave of two Lots of Land lying in Sunderland in County and province of P commonly known by No 14 and 21 and also part of the fifty acre lot No 6[vi] Beginning upon the North end of the Lot No 14 Containing ten acres by the same (?) or side all being of the same Division of fifty acre Lots of Land in P township with a Dwelling House[vii] …THIS SECTION OMITTED.

In witness where of I have here unto set my hand on this Seventeeth Day of September in the year one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy two[viii] and the twelth year of his Magisty Reign (signed) Stephen Washborn in presence of Gideon Brownson Cornelie Brownson

Sign Sealed and Delivered

The (?) of Fifty acre Lots is (?) between the twenty Seventeeth and Eighteenth Lines

Bennington April 29th 1789 then the within named Stephen Washburn personally appearing acknowledged the within instrument to Be his free act and Deed[ix]

This deed ReceivedMarch 6th 1790 by Abner Hill Town clerk[x]

An analysis of lots (see photos) confirms that Samuel Payne lived at the confluence of Batten Kill and Mill Creek. A town history mentioned that Samuel Payne was the first to run a grist mill near the northwest corner of Sunderland, and I had deduced that he would have lived on Mill Brook. A comparison of the lot map and a map of old Sunderland above shows this well.

Scan 1 copy Sunderland lots

A lot plan of Sunderland found at Vermont Maps and Plans. I have enhanced the numbering and outlined the land lots mentioned in the deed. According to the information found at the site “Sunderland was created by a New Hampshire grant in 1761. Princetown, a New York patent (“paper town”) of 1765, was in the area of present Arlington, Dorset, Sunderland and Manchester.”

One more mystery yet unsolved: when did he sell this land? I was unable to find two deeds referenced in the index in which he sold to an Amos Brownson and an Amos Chipman. I wrote to Sunderland’s clerk for advice and have a few ideas of my own.

Meanwhile, back to the Family History Center—did I say I have a new obsession?

[i] Through my father, Ralph Croy, son of Justus Croy, son of Sarah Angelina Smith Croy, daughter of Sephronia Payne Smith, daughter of Zerah Payne, son of Samuel

[ii] Sunderland Town Records Deeds, Vol 3, 1760-1815; image 323; FamilySearch filmed 8 September 1952 [accessed on-line at Family Research Center, Prather, CA on 24 August 2017]

[iii] The original owner, Stephen Washburn, likely owned the land under New York charter when Sunderland was considered by New York as part of Albany County.

[iv] The land (110 acres) cost 68 pounds in 1772.

[v] Confirms other documents from Williamstown records and town histories putting Samuel Payne in Williamstown before moving to Sunderland.

[vi] Samuel Payen (Payne) purchased lots 14, 21 and part of 6 in Sunderland (and likely because of the dispute the province of the Sunderland land was left with a P, neither New York or New Hampshire.)

[vii] The property he bought already had a dwelling house.

[viii] Samuel bought this land on September 17, 1772.

[ix] Stephen Washburn had to appear when Samuel finally entered his deed in the town records April 29, 1789, likely concerned that his property be acknowledged before Vermont became a state. He also had bought property in Panton, Vermont in 1788 (see this post).

[x] I’ve gotten to know and appreciate Abner Hill quite well as I’ve read the town records including his unique spellings and offhand organization.

Details of 4x Great-grandfather Samuel Payne in Sunderland, Bennington County, Vermont

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Sm Payne cattle mark vol 1 Sunderland blogThis past week I drove six-miles to our local Family History Center. Lucky right? And I live in a rural community. The ease of access amazes me. More amazing? I’d never been there.

I had discovered digital images for Sunderland, Vermont land records on the FamilySearch. Having pinpointed the date Samuel Payne bought land in Addison, Vermont after leaving Bennington County, VT, I was anxious to confirm that he had lived in Sunderland as I suspected. This based on a brief mention I discovered in a history of the township. My double-click gave me this message:

“These images are viewable: When using the site at a family history center.

I went, of course, and the trip introduced me to some wonderful, like-minded genealogists, while my exploration of the land records netted amazing results. What a boon! Besides confirming, on a major historical note, that Ethan Allen and his brother Ira Allen purchased a wealth of land in Sunderland right after the Revolutionary War (Volume 3, pg 23-25), I found out Samuel Payne was one of the early settlers there.

Here is what I discovered in the first unnumbered pages of Volume 3 which began with earmarks and Council minutes then moved on to 1784 land records…odd:

  • On March 29, 1774 Samuel Pane (Payne), Abel Blanchard, and Daniel Comstock were on a committee to sell the Scott lot
  • On April 27, 1777 Samuel Payen (Payne) registered his mark with the clerk: a crop in the left ear and a half-penny in the upper side of the right (more on that below!)
  • On March 8, 1778 Samuel Pane (Payne) was on a committee with John Lee, and Charles Everts to survey for a highway

The first pages of Volume 3 are filled with pages of cattle heads, 5 to a page, some heads were unclaimed and some, like Samuel’s, were claimed and dated. I had never seen this before, but townsmen were required to mark all of their cattle (by this meaning all cows, pigs, and sheep) with a mark registered with the town clerk. A short explanation specific to Connecticut Colony can be found here. My research indicates it was a common practice in the colonies allowing them to distinguish animals both in a free range environment and in circumstances where a cow, pig, or sheepherder tended all the township’s animals.

The early volumes (1-5) are a confusing mixture of Council Meeting minutes, early vital records of individual families, land records, and ear-marks with records from disparate years right next to each other on the pages. Because of the mishmash, I found the index of minimal use. For example, land records for Samuel Payne should appear in Volume 1, pages 63, 67, and 87 but I couldn’t find them there. I must have looked four times! And Ira Allen’s land records in Volume 1 should appear on page 221, but there are not that many pages in the volume. I have more work to do—see you next week!

The Payne Family in Vermont or How to Find Information beyond Name Searches

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Once again the e-mails I receive from other researchers, have spurred me to reevaluate my research, including how I proceed. I’m inspecting the Payne family of Vermont in greater depth, since they (and consequently the Green Mountain Boys and the battle of Bennington) are the inspiration for my next book. I know Samuel Payne lived in Bennington, Vermont because his name is mentioned in histories of Sunderland, Vermont and because of his military record spanning 1777 and 1781(see this post). Afterwards, he appears in the 1790 Federal Census in Panton, Addison County, Vermont.

 

So, the big question is: When exactly did the family make the move from Bennington to Panton? The answer came by doggedly following the trail laid out through FamilySearch Wiki, indexes, and records. Name searches revealed none of this information.

Before I began my search, I knew who (Samuel Payne), where (Panton, VT) and when (between 1781 and 1790). I outline my process below.

  1. FamilySearch Wiki: Go to the wiki for the place you are interested in researching. https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Main_Page In my case, Panton, VT had the actual deeds and grants beginning in 1761. Wow![i]
  2. The resource includes an index, but I didn’t know this when I began. The resource looked like this Deeds, town and vital records, v. 2 1784-1793 Deeds, v. 0 1784 Deeds, town and vital records, v. 3 1792-1801 Deeds, town and vital records, v. 4 1801-1825 But when I clicked on it, I went to the very first page and an index was there,[ii] along with Volume I, not mentioned above: Panton Proprietors Record 1761- 1837. It looked like this:
    Index of Panton S Pain

    Look carefully: 4th entry down on left and 6th down on right.

     

  3. Now I have page numbers for my search, but those are not the IMAGE pages. I need to estimate the image page by dividing the page number of the document by 2 (there are two pages for each image) and adding the pages before the NUMBERED pages begin. Hope you are following me. Anyway, I estimated, searched, and found these:deed image 64 p 113 Panton S Payen copy

land record of Samuel Payen copyThe question answered: Samuel Payne bought land in Panton first on May 1, 1788 (21 acres) and again on June 14, 1788 (35 acres). The land was situated along Otter Creek. Using a similar method of discovery I went to v. 4 and found the deed (Pg. 477) in which he sold a single parcel of 75 acres on Otter Creek to Edward Gray on November 3, 1812. This indicates he likely purchased about 20 acres of land to make the full parcel after the summer of 1788.

Of course, now I needed a great map! Check out the one above from, where else, the Library of Congress.

[i] A note: some of these digital images are only available for viewing at a Family History Center. Panton’s were available on-line. Bennington’s require a Family History Center. Luckily one is just down the road from me, so I’ll be visiting soon.

[ii] An aside regarding indexes in Ancestry: often a name search leads to an index, but search the record. Often it is a complete record and the actual document is found on later pages.

 

A Revolutionary War Tragedy and Two Sons Named Zerah

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Data on a page, or a story of family sorrow?

Data on a page, or a story of family sorrow?

Samuel Payne and Abigail Grimes Payne are my 4x great grandfather and grandmother. His son, Zerah, had a daughter, Sephronia, who gave birth to my great grandmother Sarah Angeline Smith who married Calvin Croy.

Not long after the Battle of Bennington (August 16, 1777,) in Bennington, Vermont on November 29, 1777, Samuel Payne joined the “Green Mountain Boys” (formally the Continental Troop under Captain William McCune (McCun) in the Battalion of Forces commanded by Col. Seth Warner.) The enlistment originally was for a three-year term, but family tragedy intervened.[i]

In April of 1778 on the 22nd and 23rd, his oldest son, sixteen years old Zerah Payne, signed up along with 17 other young men to serve the newly formed Vermont Militia. (Vermont, less than a year before in July, had become a separate independent republic.) Who knows to what purpose they were employed, likely some necessary form of manual labor “of Capt. Comstock’s company …by order from Governor Chittenden.” He received 3 shillings 4 pence for the duty and it wet his eager young appetite for more.

When Capt. William Hutchins formed the Provential troops in service of the United States on May 1, 1778, Zerah (Zeruah Pain in the record) enlisted for a seven month term. He was seventeen and a half and was killed on May 26, 1778. No official record exists as to how this occurred. There were no major battles or even minor skirmishes recorded with Captain Hutchins’ Company during that timeline. So perhaps the “family lore” is correct. (Note that it could not be “before the Battle of Bennington” as that battle occurred long before his death.)

“The story is handed down in the family that he was killed by the accidental discharge of a comrade gun before the Battle of Bennington. The village men and boys were getting such weapons as they had ordered and one boy had a very decrepid (sic) and superannuated gun which the other boys were laughing at and making jokes. The owner, in fun picked up the lock, which was detatched (sic) from the barrel and merely held it on the barrel and aimed it at the group about him. The barrel was loaded, and he snapped the trigger and by some strange chance, the load was discharged killing Zerah.”[ii]

No matter how the death occurred, the pain of loss is great. And the pain of an untimely and early death of a beloved child is beyond measure. Samuel’s wife Abigail, to accentuate the stress, was five months pregnant. Samuel arranged an early release on July 15, 1778. In September of that year, Abigail gave birth to a son.[iii]

Much later, on July 1, 1781, Samuel enlisted in the Vermont Militia along with his second born son, seventeen year-old Jared, since Zerah’s death, his oldest boy. They served in Capt. Daniel Comstock’s Company in the Battalion of Infantry commanded by Samuel Fletcher in the service of the State of Vermont.[iv] Samuel enlisted for 150 days and earned 11 pounds 16 shillings, while Jared served for 171 days earning ll pounds 8 shillings. Note that for twenty-one fewer days of duty Samuel earned 8 shillings more indicating that Samuel in some way earned more through some type of greater responsibility. While the period in which they served saw no major conflicts in Vermont, it was a pivotal point in the Revolutionary War eventually leading to winning of the war.[v]

And that son who celebrated his third birthday while his father and brother served with Capt. Comstock? They named him Zerah. He grew to be a boot maker moving with his wife Amy first to Zaneville and then Coshocton County, Ohio. He is my 3x great grandfather.

[i] All Military information from: NARA M881. Compiled service records of soldiers who served in the American Army during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783. www.fold3.com

[ii] Notes of Rosa Belle Phelps Gordon from personal collection

[iii] Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection – Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.

[iv] Vermont became a state on March 4, 1791 but the copy of the original record indicated “state,” a likely error.

[v] See this link for a better understanding of the import of 1781

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/amrev/peace/

 

Samuel Payne and Family: Before his Revolutionary War Enlistment

Catamount Tavern where Colonel Stark planned for the Battle of Bennington

Catamount Tavern where Colonel Stark planned for the Battle of Bennington

In the previous posts we explored the family of Zerah Payne and Amy Felch Payne in Coshocton County, Ohio. Their granddaughter, Sarah Angeline Smith, married Calvin Croy, my great grandfather. Zerah Payne was the son of Samuel Payne.

I devote this post to Samuel’s story as I can best cipher it from analysis of various mentions of him in the Williamstown history from 1907[i].Samuel was born (1733) in Woodbridge, New Haven, Connecticut to William Payne II and Ester Carnes Payne. He married Amy Grimes (Graham) from Wethersfield, Connecticut in 1757.[ii] Samuel was a busy if somewhat restless man with decent resources for speculation. His first child, Lavinia (also called Lorena) was born in 1758 “in the Nine Partners,” this being a section of Dutchess County set aside for land speculation and lot division in 1697. This coincides with the mention in the Williamstown, Massachusetts records that “Warren, a yeoman, sold to Samuel Payn, Of Dutchess County, New York, carpenter…” the land noted in the quote below. He was considered “enterprising and apparently well-to-do” buying at least an additional 200 acres and mill rights, though he never developed a mill and soon sold the rights. The Williamstown history indicates that

“In June, 1761, Gideon Warren…sold to Samuel Payen, for 6 pounds, ‘two acres on Green river, part of a lot known as No. 30, beginning at the N.W. corner of M.L. 47, thence North 20 rods, thence East 16 rods across Green river, thence South 20 rods on the east side of the river, thence West across the river 16 rods to the place of beginning, with privilege of flowing the river bank as hie up as ye top of ye upper falls’; ‘and also a strip of land two rods wide by the west side of said river beginning at the north side of said land I sold to said Payn, and running north by said river to the mouth of the brook (Phebe’s Brook), and up the hill to the lot now enclosed and so out to the main road or Highway, to be a highway for the use of the town.’ This was a very important deed. Gideon Warren and Samuel Payen solved the mill question, opened up Water Street into Main just as it runs to-day…”

I propose the following timeline for Samuel and Abigail Payne’s residences based on birth and Williamstown historical information.

  • First Samuel’s place of birth, Woodbridge, New Haven, Conn., and Abigail Grimes Wethersfield, Conn.
  • Then, Dutchess County, New York in the “Nine Partners” after his marriage in 1757
  • Back to New Haven by 1761 (where the first Zerah Payne was born on September 26, 1761)
  • Soon after the birth of this son he brought his family to Williamstown, Massachusetts where he had bought land on June 1, 1761

Things seemed quite domestic in Williamstown for a while, a time when Abigail bore five more children: son Jared (1763,) daughters Kulvah (1766,) Asenath (1768,) Cloe (1770,) and son Amase (1772.)

Battle of Bennington Map from 1777

Battle of Bennington Map from 1777

Then came the Revolutionary War and the threat, in August of 1777, to Bennington, Vermont just over the border from Williamstown, Massachusetts. General John Burgoyne was working his way south, invading New York and attempting to cut off the “rebel” forces and regain control of New York Colony. Short on supplies, he sent Colonel Fredrick Baum and his Hessian troops on a foraging expedition to Bennington. Vermont’s Council of Safety called out for help and John Stark and about 1,500 troops from New Hampshire responded. They fought off the first on-slot but Hessian reinforcements arrived. Responding reinforcements from Saratoga reached the battle ground in the form of Seth Warner’s Vermont Regiment of the Continental Army commonly called “The Green Mountain Boys.” The Continentals won a resounding victory that eventually led to the surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga. The following accounting gives a perspective of the battle from viewpoint of the Williamstown community.

“A circumstance that will commemorate forever the old log schoolhouse of West Hoosac was the assembling within it of the pious women of Williamstown on the afternoon of Aug. 16, 1777, to pray for the safety and victory of their fathers and brothers and kinsfolk in the battle of Bennington, then raging. The sharp and credible tradition is, that there were not men enough left in the entire town ‘to put out a fir.’ The boom of cannon to the northward was occasionally heard by the participants while the meeting was in progress; their fears were deepened by the sight of women and children in wagons and on foot, with their little valuables snatched up, hurrying past towards places of safety from Bennington and Pownal; and their hearts were filled to the full with gratitude when, in the edge of the Saturday evening, a swift horseman, said to have been sent by Major Isaac Stratton, of South Williamstown, from the field of fight, rode past the schoolhouse into the anxious hamlet, announcing a great victory, and so breaking up a unique prayer-meeting that had lasted for hours without intermission.” From Origins in Williamstown written 1892

From the above quote we can assume that Samuel played a civilian roll in the Battle of Bennington. Soon after the battle, on November 29, 1777, Samuel Payne enlisted with Warner’s Regiment for a three-year term. Tragedy (or at least it can be assumed) cut his service short. (Revolutionary War documentation to follow in the next post.)

Next post: The Payne family experience of the Revolutionary War and the aftermath.

[i] Vital records of Williamstown, Massachusetts to the year 1850.Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1907

[ii] Families of Ancient New Haven, Vol 1-3 Baltimore, MD, USA Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1981 (originals from New Haven colony Historical Society New Haven Conn.)

What is True?

Major General Henry Knox Was he a direct relation? Highly unlikely!

Major General Henry Knox
Was he a direct relation? Highly unlikely!

I imply nothing ethereal in the title’s question. Evidence/documentation is the mantra of genealogy. But what is a preponderance of evidence, scientific or otherwise? A great blog delving into this debate can be found here[i], but the following account, I think, exposes the issue with concrete experience.

I focused my investigation of late into the ancestors of Zerah Paine and Amy Felch Payne, discussed in the previous two posts (on a personal note, my 3xgreat grandparents.) Three lines of research presented themselves. First, the interesting little biography in The History of Coshocton County quoted below. The next source was information from the …Ancient New Haven and Vital Records of Williamstown Massachusetts that provided an extensive lineage of the Payne (Payen, Paine, Payn…variously spelled) family. Finally, I discovered a notation on a Find-a-grave link giving the birth and death dates of Samuel and his wife, Abigail Grimes(Graham) that sited a Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) number. So, how trustworthy are each of these pieces of information, or, more accurately, what do you choose to trust?

“Mr. Markley was married July 9, 1842 to Miss Selina, daughter of Lera and Ann (Felch) Payne. Mrs. Markley’s grandmother was Sarah Knox, sister of General Knox. They are the parents of fourteen children, nine of whom are deceased, viz: Caroline, William F., Cristena Frances, George E., Charles D., Mary Melissa, Judge Harper, Lily May, and Edward; and five living, viz: Samuel Asberry, Minerva Catherine, Emma, Annie E. and David, Jr.” [ii]

History and biography books encompassing a particular community were quite popular from the late 1800’s into the 1940’s. Inaccuracies are rampant. Use them as a touchstone but don’t take them as truth, though the Coshocton one is generally very good. I am acquainted with a local historian who found one of these histories containing blatant slander, all because of a rivalry between two families and the fact that the slandered gentleman wouldn’t pay for his spot in the history! Right away, in the Coshocton history, I noted the incorrect spelling of the parents of Selina Payne Markley (Zerah and Amy are the correct spelling.[iii]) as well as Samuel’s middle name (correctly Asbury.) I can’t account for all of the deceased children (Caroline, William F., George E., Charles D., Lily May and Edward) though I find it logical since they may have died in childbirth. And the Knox connection? Unlikely. General Henry Knox had many brothers and sisters but all died before adulthood except three, two brother and a sister (Peter, William, Hannah.[iv]) I searched for nieces with the name Sarah as well, but no luck. Conclusions? The note on Knox was likely a bit of pomp or wishful thinking. True? Not likely.

Next, there are the books delineating the research of genealogical societies of early historic places. I base most of my information regarding the ancestry of Samuel and Amy Felch Payne on these.[v] Given the limited records available before 1790, I rely on these as the baseline for my research and then search for historical verification of the information along with vital records it. I find they match well so, given the quality of the researchers who created these volumes and their proximity to the sources, both in place and time, I chose to believe. Note, I said, “Choose.” True? Possibly, I’d even go so far as probably.

Lastly, the Find-a-grave information that gives the birth and death dates and places of Amy Grimes Paine and Samuel Paine (the site spelling) sites a DAR number.[vi] The site does not provide a place of burial but is a “Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials.” The post uses the DAR information as the basis of the memorial. Good genealogy says to verify everything beyond actual gravestone information. I tried but could not. I went to the DAR site where the number noted is used to determine “lineal descent from Patriots of the American Revolution.” In my research I often find errors in these applications and wondered at their accuracy, so it interested me to see the following message posted clearly on their site.

“The databases contain DAR proprietary information which should under no circumstances be redistributed to others; assembled or collected for purposes other than DAR membership or for citation in genealogical scholarship; or reproduced, published or posted in any form whatsoever.”

  Well, what can I say? True? Possibly.

So what is a lover of family history to do? Enjoy the stories. Learn the history that surrounds them and those grand souls that occupied it. Don’t get too hung up on absolutes. Value the true along with the probable and possible. The stories are amazing! My next posts will contain a few.

[i] http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2015/02/the-ins-and-outs-of-evidence-for.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FQuFvc+%28Genealogy%27s+Star%29

[ii] N.N. Hill, Jr. Ed., History of Coshocton County Ohio: Its Past and Present, (Newark, Ohio: A.A. Graham & Co., 1881) Pg 743

[iii] That statement is itself relative as there are many spellings on census data and beyond. I usually rely on the spellings on gravemarkers or government documents like draft records, not census records as they vary radically. If census records are all I have I use the most frequent and most complete record.

[iv] Based on correspondence found on DAR web site and NARA. There are numerous histories on line. Check this one. http://www.dar.org/museum/exhibitions/general-henry-knox

[v] all available on Ancestry.com Original data from

  • Record of the colony and plantation of New Haven, from 1638 to 1649. Hartford: Printed by Case, Tiffany and Co., for the editor, 1857
  • Vital records of Williamstown, Massachusetts to the year 1850.Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1907
  • The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records. Vol 1-55 Baltimore, MD, USA Genealogical Publishing Co., 1994-2002
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Vol 1-3 Baltimore, MD, USA Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1981 (orginals from New Haven colony Historical Society New Haven Conn.)

[vi] Find it here. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=74915789&ref=acom

 

The New Haven Family

Catamount Tavern where Colonel Stark planned for the Battle of Bennington

Catamount Tavern where Colonel Stark planned for the Battle of Bennington

This is Catamount Tavern in Bennington, Vermont where the Allen boy’s possibly met to plan the capture of Ticonderoga in the Revolutionary War. I included it in my imaginary musings in the chapter “New Haven.” (See the page “New Haven” found above.) The family links to Sarah Payne Smith (who married Calvin Croy) were William Payne, Richard Little and Joan Walker, Henry Grimes, John Payne and Mary Little, Thomas Carnes, Joseph Grimes and Deborah Stebbins,  William Payne (2) and Esther Carnes, Christopher Grimes and Abigail Williams, and finally Samuel Payne and Abigail Grimes. New Haven Family Sheets a PDF document

A note to the family members who received the book: There is significantly more information here about the Grimes family of Wethersfield, Connecticut. I also discovered that Esther did not die in childbirth but went on to have more children. And I really loved that part of the book, too! Still, a new story emerged about Christopher and Abigail who lost all but one child, Abigail Grimes, in an epidemic, and so named their next child Comfort.