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Organizing Genealogical Records: the HOW and the WHAT

 

gold fields

And when you notice that men have disappeared in the 1850 census—right after the California ‘49er Gold Rush? They just might be there! In 1850 I missed David Markley and Samuel Croy. Samuel deserted his wife, Catherine Pugh Croy. David returned. Could be they headed to the goldfields like David’s brother, John. From Coshocton Tribune, Nov. 1924

Time to clean house—my genealogical house, that is. My goal:

 

  • Research brick walls
  • Review and update family sheets
  • Organize related files, both computer and paper

NO SMALL TASK! So I decided to take one grouping at a time.

First ones to tackle: the Ohio clan. Why? They had not been updated since 2015!

Also, the fourth of my historical fiction series, The Maggie Chronicles, delves deep into their nineteenth-century Ohio lives. The book deviates significantly from the Andrew Croy family’s real life, but my research of them revealed so much that was new or corrected that I thought I should take a closer look.

Deep in the weeds, a genealogist’s disease, I discovered much and, boy, did I organize!

Here is how:

  1. I printed out the family tree and sheets from my genealogy program to work from, numbering each of the children in birth order.
  2. All information on the children used that numbering system. i.e. In my paper files, I numbered each page of info. and paper clipped it together by date. In my computer files, I numbered each item followed by a year for each item in the parent folder. Here is an example of what that looked like. Screen Shot 2019-09-23 at 8.10.31 AM
  3. Then I set to work filling in blanks. Mind you, I’ve worked on this for ten years now and applied to a number of societies requiring detailed support so I have bunches of data. Nuts, I know. SO, HOW DO YOU ORGANIZE?

Just in case you want to get right to the chase, I’ve updated all my Ohio records. You can find them here. Ohio family sheets 9-15-2019

What I discovered—and didn’t.

  1. Two brick walls for these families are still unclimbed. HELP ANYONE?
  • HENRY SMITH: I think he is probably the brother of EVERHART SMITH (who married Selena Payne, sister of Henry’s wife Sephronia Payne…so you’d figure) BUT I can’t find a direct link yet.
  • MARGARET PUGH: wife of Jacob Croy. I made up a family in my next book, just ‘cause, but I cannot verify my guess that she is the daughter of John Pugh, likely son of Aaron.
  1. The MARKLEY family (David, Selena, and Catherine) that married into the ZERAH PAYNE family (Selena, Samuel, and Michael), always fascinated me. Another disease of a genealogist is digging deep where you don’t belong. But, hey, if you are a Markley descendent you might be interested. So I wondered:
  • Who was/were their ancestors, and—Jackpot! I found an article on an ADAM MARKLEY who had a very large family and settled in Bethlehem Township, Coshocton County, Ohio. After some digging, I found the probate records (both available on Ancestry) of Adam and his son, father of those children, FREDRICK MARKLEY.
  • Also, the aftermath of the Knox County, Indiana tragedy where I estimate at least seven Markley/Payne children died in a ten-year period after their arrival. The children of SAMUEL AND SELENA MARKLEY PAYNE were distributed: CATHERINE MARKLEY PAYNE, whose husband Michael also died, took in Amy. Daughter Rachel, then nineteen, returned to Coshocton County with Eliza and Burd. Their eldest James was already married and established in Knox County.
  1. Again digging way too deep, I clarified (or complicated) the lives of the children of Calvin and Sarah Angeline (Payne) Smith Croy.
  • A correction for CHARLES HENRY CROY that eliminated a wife (Watch out! There are more souls out there with the same name and similar birthdates that you might think!)
  • The addition of a second wife for WILLIAM DUNCAN CROY (DELLA SLAUGHTER) She eventually married William’s mother Sarah’s sister Selena’s son, EARLE UFFNER.
  • A little more information on DAVID HARRISON CROY and his complicated marriage history, including a new birth certificate for his son Daniel, which gives his father as an Everett McCoy. David always claimed this boy as his and Louise Marie, aka Billie Lou Moody (among other names) gave a lot of different/questionable versions of information on her documents.

Check out this post for more of the convoluted.

So, I’m brain dead, cross-eyed, and exhausted. Tomorrow—I return an Ohio in the 1800s and the imaginary world of my making.

Family Felch and a Converging on Ohio Update

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children only

FIND YOUR “REAL THING!” Here is mine:from the Williamstown records found in Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988. I am fictionalizing their story. What stories are buried in your family’s long ago time?

As promised in my previous post, I have researched and updated the now broken brick wall of Amy Felch who married Zerah Payne in Maine. They, soon after, moved to Coshocton County, Ohio, and were the grandparents of Sarah Angelina Payne Smith who married my great grandfather, Calvin Croy. Use the search box on the right to find out more about these family members and the research to back my findings.

 

I have also updated the Ohio page which can be reached at the very top of my website. I rectified an error that excluded the Pennsylvania family sheets and added what you see below.

Again, I encourage you to go beyond name searches and search the written records themselves, when available. Most of the Felch research, beyond what I discussed in the previous post, came from the Massachusetts Vital and Town Records, an accumulation of the Town and City Clerk records of MA (found on line through Ancestry and Family Search).

This information is so complete and wide ranging that I decided to take a detour. Since I knew the town of residence for Samuel and Abigail Payne while they lived in Massachusetts (Williamstown), I went to the town records themselves and found the actual longhand record of their children’s births! I’d had the indexed records for a long time, but what a treat to see the real thing!

Here are the results of my Felch family foray. 

From Massachusetts to Maine

Maine LOC 1798 copy

The Felch Family meets up with the Paynes

Here are the family sheets with births, deaths, and important detail that I have discovered so far. Any comments that help further the investigation are welcome. To err is human, and I have surely been human in my attempts. FELCH Family Sheet

The Maine Family Felch

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Maine LOC 1798 copy

SW corner of Maine, 1798. I’ve underlined key places. A. Where Jonathan and Sarah were married. B. Where Jonathan lived first. C. Where his brother, Abijah, lived. D. Where Jonathan moved in 1799 and where Zerah Payne and Amy Felch Payne married. Find full map at Library of Congress here.

I had to say STOP. With the launch of The Scattering of Stones complete, the “final” edit of book two, The Forging of Frost, nearly finished, my third book’s characters screaming their story in my ear, I turned to my heritage. I’m so glad I did.

Enter the Felch family, particularly Amy Felch. I’ve long avoided tackling the ancestry of Amy (Amey) Felch (Feltch), wife of Zerah Payne.[i] I knew she married him[ii] but had no definitive documentation of her parentage. Still, while researching book number three, a fictionalized account of Samuel Payne and wife, Abigail Graham (Grimes) Payne in Bennington County, Vermont, she kept popping to mind. So I dove in.

While the genealogy research adage—work your way back—is true, sometimes you must succumb—and work your way forward. The Memorial History of the Felch Family in America and Wales, written in 1881 by W. Farrand Felch of Columbus, Ohio, it is a wonderful, well-researched read. Find it here. (I’m a history/genealogy nerd so consider the source.)

He gives us this abbreviated tree where I’ve underlined the key ancestry.memorialhistoryo00felc_0071 chart

Amy Felch isn’t listed in the book, but one comment stood out. It was a reference to the offspring of Nathaniel Felch (Henry, Henry Jr., John) and Mary Hanks.

“Nathaniel [Jr.] had a son born at Reading (Jonathan) April 2 1762, exactly one year after his marriage, and he soon afterwards removed to Maine, where all trace is lost of his descendants; a tradition says that he settled in the center of Maine where his stalwart descendants still reside, ‘all six-footers.’”[iii]

Since Zerah Payne married Abigail Felch in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine, I thought I should investigate. From my search, I think I can, with some confidence, trace Abigail’s family history.

A tree and family sheet for Amy Felch Paynes family is in the works. Until then, I’ve expanded W. Farrand Payne’s tree, as follows:new felch tree

My rational:

  • No record of Nathaniel Felch and Molly Hammond Felch[iv] in Maine (so far) indicating they may have died before 1790 or did not make the trip to Maine. However
  • A search for Jonathan Felch shows his marriage to Sarah Appelby (Appleby, Applebee) 28 January 1784 by Matthew Merriam, pastor of the 2nd Church of Berwick, Maine. At the time he lived at Shapleigh, then Hubbardstown Plantation, Maine[v]
  • The 1790 Federal Census shows a Jona Felsh (male over 16) living in Shapleigh, York, Maine with 2 males under 16 and 3 females (one likely Sarah, the others—children Betsey and Amy). They lived next door to Hannah Felsh. (could this be the second wife widow of Nathaniel?)
  • The Maine 1799 early census index shows a Jonathan Felch in Pittston, Kennebec County, ME in 1799
  • The 1800 Federal Census shows a Jonathan Feltch (male 26-44) living in Shapleigh, York, Maine with 2 Males under 10, 2 Females under 10, 1 Female 10-15, 1 Female 16-25. (Was this Sarah? Indicating her age at marriage as 15. Jonathan would have been 38. Or, more likely a female child—see 1790—indicating Sarah’s death by 1800.) They lived next to a Samuel Feltch, see below.
  • Samuel Felch married Salley (Sarah) Bracket, both of Shapleigh 21 December 1800. (possible brother or step-brother of Jonathan—Find-a-Grave stone gives death 23 September 1836, calculated birth 1777.)
  • Jonathan Felch, residence, Pittston, was a defendant in a case of debt at the Kennebec County Supreme Judicial Court in June 1802
  • A Betsey Felch married Seth Lamb in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine on 8 November 1807
  • Zerah W. Payne and Amy Felch marry in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine on 3 May
  • The 1810 Federal Census shows a Jonathan Felch, over 45, in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine with 1 Male under 10, 1 Male 10-15, 2 Males 16-25, 2 Females 10-15, and a Female over 45. (This accounts for all but one male child from earlier accounts and all females but the two oldest, by then married. Note: the 1800 census does not account for 2 males. More research is needed to determine Jonathan and Sarah’s progeny.
  • By 1810 Amy Felch Payne (the subject of this research) and Zerah Payne had disappeared from Maine, though their first born Samuel Felch Payne lists Massachusetts as his birth place.[vi] Their next know residence is implied by an advertisement of a Zerah Payne’s shoe business placed in the Zanesville Express and Republican Standard, 14 February 1814—not quite 8 years after their marriage.

If anyone has more information, I would love to hear from you!

[i] She bore Sephronia Payne, who married Henry Smith, and bore Sarah Angelina Smith Croy (my great-grandmother and wife of Calvin Croy). Evidence listed in other posts.
[ii] Zerah W. Payne m. Amey Felch 30 May 1808 in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine. Maine Marriage Records, 1713-1922. Augusta, Maine: Maine State Archives. Ancestry.com [accessed 14 March 2018]
[iii] pg 26 of Felch book
[iv] Nathaniel Felch of Weston m Molly Hammond, 2 April 1761. Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records. Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute. Ancestry.com. [accessed 14 March 2018]
[v] New England Historic Genealogical Society. The England Historical and Genealogical Register. Boston Ancestry.com [accessed 14 March 2018} and Maine Marriage Records, 1713-1922. Augusta, Maine: Maine State Archives. Ancestry.com [accessed 14 March 2018]
[vi] Maine was part of Massachusetts in 1810, his calculated date of birth: 1860 census for Vincennes, Knox, Indiana

A Revolutionary War Tragedy and Two Sons Named Zerah

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Data on a page, or a story of family sorrow?

Data on a page, or a story of family sorrow?

Samuel Payne and Abigail Grimes Payne are my 4x great grandfather and grandmother. His son, Zerah, had a daughter, Sephronia, who gave birth to my great grandmother Sarah Angeline Smith who married Calvin Croy.

Not long after the Battle of Bennington (August 16, 1777,) in Bennington, Vermont on November 29, 1777, Samuel Payne joined the “Green Mountain Boys” (formally the Continental Troop under Captain William McCune (McCun) in the Battalion of Forces commanded by Col. Seth Warner.) The enlistment originally was for a three-year term, but family tragedy intervened.[i]

In April of 1778 on the 22nd and 23rd, his oldest son, sixteen years old Zerah Payne, signed up along with 17 other young men to serve the newly formed Vermont Militia. (Vermont, less than a year before in July, had become a separate independent republic.) Who knows to what purpose they were employed, likely some necessary form of manual labor “of Capt. Comstock’s company …by order from Governor Chittenden.” He received 3 shillings 4 pence for the duty and it wet his eager young appetite for more.

When Capt. William Hutchins formed the Provential troops in service of the United States on May 1, 1778, Zerah (Zeruah Pain in the record) enlisted for a seven month term. He was seventeen and a half and was killed on May 26, 1778. No official record exists as to how this occurred. There were no major battles or even minor skirmishes recorded with Captain Hutchins’ Company during that timeline. So perhaps the “family lore” is correct. (Note that it could not be “before the Battle of Bennington” as that battle occurred long before his death.)

“The story is handed down in the family that he was killed by the accidental discharge of a comrade gun before the Battle of Bennington. The village men and boys were getting such weapons as they had ordered and one boy had a very decrepid (sic) and superannuated gun which the other boys were laughing at and making jokes. The owner, in fun picked up the lock, which was detatched (sic) from the barrel and merely held it on the barrel and aimed it at the group about him. The barrel was loaded, and he snapped the trigger and by some strange chance, the load was discharged killing Zerah.”[ii]

No matter how the death occurred, the pain of loss is great. And the pain of an untimely and early death of a beloved child is beyond measure. Samuel’s wife Abigail, to accentuate the stress, was five months pregnant. Samuel arranged an early release on July 15, 1778. In September of that year, Abigail gave birth to a son.[iii]

Much later, on July 1, 1781, Samuel enlisted in the Vermont Militia along with his second born son, seventeen year-old Jared, since Zerah’s death, his oldest boy. They served in Capt. Daniel Comstock’s Company in the Battalion of Infantry commanded by Samuel Fletcher in the service of the State of Vermont.[iv] Samuel enlisted for 150 days and earned 11 pounds 16 shillings, while Jared served for 171 days earning ll pounds 8 shillings. Note that for twenty-one fewer days of duty Samuel earned 8 shillings more indicating that Samuel in some way earned more through some type of greater responsibility. While the period in which they served saw no major conflicts in Vermont, it was a pivotal point in the Revolutionary War eventually leading to winning of the war.[v]

And that son who celebrated his third birthday while his father and brother served with Capt. Comstock? They named him Zerah. He grew to be a boot maker moving with his wife Amy first to Zaneville and then Coshocton County, Ohio. He is my 3x great grandfather.

[i] All Military information from: NARA M881. Compiled service records of soldiers who served in the American Army during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783. www.fold3.com

[ii] Notes of Rosa Belle Phelps Gordon from personal collection

[iii] Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection – Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.

[iv] Vermont became a state on March 4, 1791 but the copy of the original record indicated “state,” a likely error.

[v] See this link for a better understanding of the import of 1781

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/amrev/peace/

 

Samuel Payne and Family: Before his Revolutionary War Enlistment

Catamount Tavern where Colonel Stark planned for the Battle of Bennington

Catamount Tavern where Colonel Stark planned for the Battle of Bennington

In the previous posts we explored the family of Zerah Payne and Amy Felch Payne in Coshocton County, Ohio. Their granddaughter, Sarah Angeline Smith, married Calvin Croy, my great grandfather. Zerah Payne was the son of Samuel Payne.

I devote this post to Samuel’s story as I can best cipher it from analysis of various mentions of him in the Williamstown history from 1907[i].Samuel was born (1733) in Woodbridge, New Haven, Connecticut to William Payne II and Ester Carnes Payne. He married Amy Grimes (Graham) from Wethersfield, Connecticut in 1757.[ii] Samuel was a busy if somewhat restless man with decent resources for speculation. His first child, Lavinia (also called Lorena) was born in 1758 “in the Nine Partners,” this being a section of Dutchess County set aside for land speculation and lot division in 1697. This coincides with the mention in the Williamstown, Massachusetts records that “Warren, a yeoman, sold to Samuel Payn, Of Dutchess County, New York, carpenter…” the land noted in the quote below. He was considered “enterprising and apparently well-to-do” buying at least an additional 200 acres and mill rights, though he never developed a mill and soon sold the rights. The Williamstown history indicates that

“In June, 1761, Gideon Warren…sold to Samuel Payen, for 6 pounds, ‘two acres on Green river, part of a lot known as No. 30, beginning at the N.W. corner of M.L. 47, thence North 20 rods, thence East 16 rods across Green river, thence South 20 rods on the east side of the river, thence West across the river 16 rods to the place of beginning, with privilege of flowing the river bank as hie up as ye top of ye upper falls’; ‘and also a strip of land two rods wide by the west side of said river beginning at the north side of said land I sold to said Payn, and running north by said river to the mouth of the brook (Phebe’s Brook), and up the hill to the lot now enclosed and so out to the main road or Highway, to be a highway for the use of the town.’ This was a very important deed. Gideon Warren and Samuel Payen solved the mill question, opened up Water Street into Main just as it runs to-day…”

I propose the following timeline for Samuel and Abigail Payne’s residences based on birth and Williamstown historical information.

  • First Samuel’s place of birth, Woodbridge, New Haven, Conn., and Abigail Grimes Wethersfield, Conn.
  • Then, Dutchess County, New York in the “Nine Partners” after his marriage in 1757
  • Back to New Haven by 1761 (where the first Zerah Payne was born on September 26, 1761)
  • Soon after the birth of this son he brought his family to Williamstown, Massachusetts where he had bought land on June 1, 1761

Things seemed quite domestic in Williamstown for a while, a time when Abigail bore five more children: son Jared (1763,) daughters Kulvah (1766,) Asenath (1768,) Cloe (1770,) and son Amase (1772.)

Battle of Bennington Map from 1777

Battle of Bennington Map from 1777

Then came the Revolutionary War and the threat, in August of 1777, to Bennington, Vermont just over the border from Williamstown, Massachusetts. General John Burgoyne was working his way south, invading New York and attempting to cut off the “rebel” forces and regain control of New York Colony. Short on supplies, he sent Colonel Fredrick Baum and his Hessian troops on a foraging expedition to Bennington. Vermont’s Council of Safety called out for help and John Stark and about 1,500 troops from New Hampshire responded. They fought off the first on-slot but Hessian reinforcements arrived. Responding reinforcements from Saratoga reached the battle ground in the form of Seth Warner’s Vermont Regiment of the Continental Army commonly called “The Green Mountain Boys.” The Continentals won a resounding victory that eventually led to the surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga. The following accounting gives a perspective of the battle from viewpoint of the Williamstown community.

“A circumstance that will commemorate forever the old log schoolhouse of West Hoosac was the assembling within it of the pious women of Williamstown on the afternoon of Aug. 16, 1777, to pray for the safety and victory of their fathers and brothers and kinsfolk in the battle of Bennington, then raging. The sharp and credible tradition is, that there were not men enough left in the entire town ‘to put out a fir.’ The boom of cannon to the northward was occasionally heard by the participants while the meeting was in progress; their fears were deepened by the sight of women and children in wagons and on foot, with their little valuables snatched up, hurrying past towards places of safety from Bennington and Pownal; and their hearts were filled to the full with gratitude when, in the edge of the Saturday evening, a swift horseman, said to have been sent by Major Isaac Stratton, of South Williamstown, from the field of fight, rode past the schoolhouse into the anxious hamlet, announcing a great victory, and so breaking up a unique prayer-meeting that had lasted for hours without intermission.” From Origins in Williamstown written 1892

From the above quote we can assume that Samuel played a civilian roll in the Battle of Bennington. Soon after the battle, on November 29, 1777, Samuel Payne enlisted with Warner’s Regiment for a three-year term. Tragedy (or at least it can be assumed) cut his service short. (Revolutionary War documentation to follow in the next post.)

Next post: The Payne family experience of the Revolutionary War and the aftermath.

[i] Vital records of Williamstown, Massachusetts to the year 1850.Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1907

[ii] Families of Ancient New Haven, Vol 1-3 Baltimore, MD, USA Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1981 (originals from New Haven colony Historical Society New Haven Conn.)

How Calvin and Sarah Met (or the Geographical History of the Payne, Markley, and Croy Families)

 

Coshocton County Townships

Coshocton County Townships

Coshocton County, Ohio was formed out of Muskingum County in 1811.

The above map should help process things as we move along. (If I name a township in this post without indicating a county, assume Coshocton County, Ohio.)

 As noted in the previous post, to understand how Calvin Croy and Sarah Angeline Smith met and married, you must follow the couple’s family connections in Coshocton County. We were introduced to Sarah’s mother, Sephronia Payne Smith, and father, Henry Smith, in the last post. In this post I attempt to mine the family relationships of the Sephronia’s family and the Croy family in Coshocton County, Ohio. The goal: explain how the paths of Calvin and Sarah crossed (with some interesting diversions in between.)

The Payne’s lived in Coshocton County from at least 1820 when Sephronia’s father moved there with his shoe and boot repair business. (More on them in the previous post.) Their children, known and living into adulthood, were Samuel Felch (1810-1868,) Sarah (1812-1903,) Sephronia (1823-1903,) Selena (1826-between 1901-1910,) and William (between 1828-1834-about 1869.) Let’s take a look at the marriages, migration, and life experiences of these children.

The story is the sad but resilient tale of pioneer life. Zerah Payne and Fredrick Markley lived near each other in Tuscarawas Township in 1820. Fredrick Markley, died in 1828 leaving his wife, Rachel, with Nathan (11,) David (9,) Selena (5,) an unknown female, and Catherine (1.) The Payne family had also suffered a loss with Zerah Payne dying in1831. David Markley married Selena Payne on June 9, 1843 (Yes, Selena, just to make it confusing, each family had a Selena.) By 1850 David and Selena lived with her sister, Sephronia Payne Smith and Henry Smith, in Licking County, Ohio just southwest of Pike Township.

The rest of the Markley children connected in some way to the Payne family by 1850. Samuel Felch Payne had first married an Elizabeth Rice in Coshocton on March 4, 1830. Before 1850, Elizabeth died and Samuel then married Selena Markley, September 16, 1850. He likely met Selena Markley because she was living next to (or near) Samuel’s mother Amy Payne in Jackson Township. (Selena Markley is listed in two places in Jackson Township, Dwelling 301 next to Amy Payne who cared for Samuel’s son James, and # 278.) Then, on March 4, 1852 William Payne married Catherine Markley. Following me so far??? Samuel, William, and Selena Payne married Selena, Catherine, and David Markley.

After their marriages, in about 1858, Samuel and William Payne took off with their families to farm in Vincennes, Knox, Indiana. Samuel’s mother Amy Payne had died before 1860. They took the Markley matriarch, Rachel Markley, with them but after 1860 no record exists for her. Their hopes and dreams were not realized in Indiana. Illness ravaged them. On February 10, 1866, Selena Markley Payne died. Then, on January 17, 1868, Samuel Felch Payne died. Their son Gibson died about that time as well. The rest of children were shipped out to family, three to David and Selina and one to Catherine. Finally, in late 1869, William Payne died along with their son, Thomas. Catherine Markley Payne returned home to where everyone now lived in Canal Lewisville along the border of Tuscarawas and Keene Township.

With the deaths of Samuel and William, only the daughters were left. In 1870, two of them, Sephronia Smith and Selina Markley, lived three houses apart and between them lived Samuel Payne’s children Rachel, Eliza, and Burd. In the Smith house lived Sarah Angeline.

Coshocton County and Canal Lewisville figures geographically into the lives of the Croy family as well. In the late 1830’s, as documented in previous posts, Andrew Croy and his sons moved to Coshocton County with the growth of the Eerie/Ohio Canal. Jacob Croy, father of Calvin, lived in Mill Creek and White Eyes Townships. Most important to this story is the brother who stayed and settled in Lafayette Township, David Croy. Woodworking ran in the family. Father Andrew owned a sawmill in White Eyes Township. David, followed his footsteps and worked as a sawyer in White Eyes and Lafayette Townships. His son Robert followed suit, working as a sawyer in 1870 and then as a sawyer in 1880 in Keene Township.

No, I didn’t forget the original title of the post: How Calvin and Sarah met. After the Civil War, Calvin was living with his brother Nathan down in Fairfield Township, Washington County, near Marietta, on the homestead with his father and mother where he is listed as a laborer in 1870. Then his father died in 1872.

As noted two posts back, Calvin had a restless spirit. It is likely that he jumped at the chance to move out from under his older brother’s shadow and go work with his cousin in Keene Township. They may have even formed a business together. At any rate, by 1880 Calvin was working as a sawyer in Keene Township. He and Sarah lived only 24 houses apart from cousin Robert Croy. (How close were they to Canal Lewisville? My grandfather, Justus Croy, born on October 10, 1879 lists Lewisville as his place of birth on the World War I draft card.)

By the way, when searching your family be careful and check the originals carefully. I found error in the transcription of  townships, names, and households from the original. An 1820 census included two to three townships on each page and all were listed as one township! Needless to say, but I will, my brain is fried. I’m happy to return to fiction for a few days!

And look at this! Written in 1881, this History of Coshocton County contains a hint as to the parentage of Amy Felch, someone I had no definitive information on before. Yes, the piece contains some errors, but not many. And THAT is where I go next, following Zerah Payne and Amy Felch Payne back in time and ancestry. See ya then!

“MARKLEY DAVID, Tuscarawas township; farmer; was born October 13, 1819, in this township; son of Frederick and Rachel (Cartmill) Markley. David’s father came to Coshocton county in 1803 and located in Bethlehem township on the Walhonding river. His ancestors came from Maryland and are of German descent. David’s father died when the boy was but nine years old, from which age Mr. Markley has depended entirely on his own industry and management for success, and it is but just to state here that he has by honest and judicious economy obtained an ample competence for his family and himself, and to do a liberal share in assisting in all charitable and religious enterprises of his neighborhood. He also takes a live interest in education. Mr. Markley was married July 9, 1842, to Miss Selina, daughter of Lera and Ann (Felch) Payne. Mrs. Markley’s grandmother was Sarah Knox, sister of General Knox. They are the parents of fourteen children, nine of whom are deceased, viz: Caroline, William F., Christena Frances, George E., Charles D., Mary Melissa, Judge Harper, Lily May and Edward; and five living, viz: Samuel Asberry, Minerva Catherine, Emma, Annie E. and David, Jr.”

 Information for this post taken from:
  • com census data for Ohio between 1820 and 1880 and Vincennes, Knox, Indiana 1860, 1870 (Yes, I know I didn’t use the “official” style…look back to other posts. I do know how.)
  • Marriage information comes from Ancestry.com. Marriages, Coshocton County, Ohio, 1811-1930. Provo, UT: Originally compiled by Miriam C. Hunter Coshocton Public Library, 1991.
  • N. Hill, Jr. Ed., History of Coshocton County Ohio: Its Past and Present, (Newark, Ohio: A.A. Graham & Co., 1881) Pg 743
  • Note: repeating family names given for numerous children are Samuel, Asbury, Judge, Justus, Amy